Behold the champions of the first season of America’s Greatest Makers: Team Grush and their gamified smart toothbrush.

Their victory occurred in last night’s season finale, where Grush’s three person team beat out four other finalists to take home $1,000,000.

It’s a massive prize, and one that validates the significance of makers, as it will be used to help launch the winning product into production.

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“We were so excited when we got the check, then we walked outside and realized they have to do this, and this, and this, and this,” explained Grush co-founder Ethan Schur, telling us they’re quickly jumping from celebration mode right back into maker mode, and will be flying to China in about a week to ramp up orders. They will be using part of money to buy the parts they need and to solidify firmware. 

Grush, a computerized toothbrush designed to combat dental disease in kids, maps the users mouth with stated precision, and then sends a report back to the parents on underbrushed areas after use. Combined with a smartphone game, it can target the spots in a kid’s mouth that he or she usually misses, and guide them to that area. “Dental disease is the number one chronic disease affecting children today,” Grush co-founder Anubha Sacheti tells us.

Through the show, the winners also showed development of  a companion smart-flossing device, and tell us that they’ll be launching some new technologies soon to become the central hub of a connected-bathroom health initiative.

From here, the team is plotting a course for CES 2017, where they’ll need to have a finished product. $1 million is interesting, but we need to become a $1 billion valuation company selling one billion toothbrushes to children,” Schur says.

Team Grush at tech camp

The eight-episode series began with 24 teams, following them from Tech Shop to a glossy set where they’d pitch and update the panel of judges on their products, and face elimination rounds in a standard reality TV format. Produced by Mark Burnett and MGM television in conjunction with Intel, it puts the Maker community in the spotlight in a major way, combining maker-hero guest judges like Arduino co-founder Massimo Banzi with mainstream celebrities like Shaquille O’Neal. The show leverages the Intel Curie (and Arduino 101) as a major piece of technology for the teams to build around.

It appears to be a success for TBS; casting for season two is already underway.