Maker Faire Paris is all done! It has been a fantastic faire full of incredible makers. It seems that the majority of the projects here are simply passion projects, built simply for the pleasure of making. I did shoot a video walk through, which I’ll hopefully publish in a week or so.


To finish off the day, Sherry Huss and I got our portrait done in the light painting studio. I misplaced their info, I’ll update this later when I find it again.

These impressive cosplay creations were on display. It is almost hard to believe that this is all made from foam! Much easier to believe it when they’re showing you exactly how to do it.


Maker Fight is a group that does robot battling. They set up an arena and were letting people from the crowd drive the bots around. The main weapons were disabled for this event because there isn’t a top on the arena and they didn’t want metal bits flying all over!

Most of the drive parts are salvaged from cordless drills. Interestingly they reused the body and trigger of one as a horn as you can see below.


This group, Oui Are Makers, noticed that there was no site for native French speakers to document their projects. There is instructibles and hackster but none for native French speakers. So they made one! OuiAreMakers.com has only been up for a little over a year but they already have over 10,000 users. New projects are being uploaded every day from food to robots.


 

This group, called Craftnsound, has a website where you can design your own furniture speakers. They then cut the parts and send you a kit that you can assemble and paint on your own. Seems like a cool concept. Currently the site has only a few limited options, but they explained that they’re working on making it automatically configure the inside volume of the furniture for optimal acoustics. the site is being developed entirely by just two brothers, so they have much to complete.


These jelly fish caught my eye from quite far away. As I stood and watched, I noticed that they would change color as the artist waived her hand over a box on the desk. Upon further inspection, there were IR proximity sensors there.

You can find more of her work at Sokadesign.fr . I especially liked that even the control box was intricately decorated.


This maker’s entire display fix in this medium sized box. He’s making music using the stepper motors in computer parts.

It was a bit difficult to hear over the ambient noise of the maker faire, but still captivating. I really liked that the whole thing was completely portable.

 


The Maker Faire Paris team brought in photographer Quentin Chevrier to capture the event. He did a fantastic job and sent me a selection of some of his favorite images from the day. Looking at these images, you can see the difference between me and a professional photographer!


Inspired by the show ThunderBirds, Dubois Patrice began making models out of old trash. Everything you see is made from discarded bits of plastic and other refuse.


This robot arm was going back and forth and removing finished prints from the machines.

The group was called MRobot and it seemed like a very useful thing to have around if you have multitudes of printers that need constant attention.


 

Experiment Boy, a French youtuber was here giving presentations. This one was particularly explosive, even in slow motion.


3d printing with clay is always mesmerizing to watch. I simply love it. I may have to modify one of my printers to do this, the final pieces just feel so good in your hand.

 


Several radio controlled boats putt around a large pool. Kids are taking turns driving them around and often crashing into eachother. There are several boat groups here, some that focus on detailed recreations and some that look like they’re focused more on performance.


 


The InMoov project was here with more bots than I’ve seen from them in the past! Some of the new ones appear to be only sculptural, but are still filled with personality.


 


These stunning dioramas from Miniature Wall Of Fame were so full of detail that you could just stare forever.


 


Have you seen the first Harry Potter movie? If so, you may recognize this door. It was beautiful in the movie, and caught Eliott’s attention. He has been faithfully recreating the door and it’s complex locking system from scratch.

The parts themselves are cnc milled from MDF. There are so many parts and so much more work to do, but it is already stunning. Unfortunately, there’s no website to see more. You’d have to be here!


The location, The City of Science and Industry, is stunning. There’s so much to look at and such wonderful natural light, it nearly feels like you’re outside. The Makers are just beginning to set up for the day and things are going from quiet to bustling in a hurry!