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notjustahousewife_mason_jar_wall_planter.jpg
As canning season draws to a close this fall, I’m really digging Stacy from Not Just a Housewife’s take on the mason-jar-and-hose-clamp decorating fad. Her mason jar wall planter is simple, sturdy, and perfect for housing vine plants that usually like to hang, and also doubles as an easy way to use up some of those extra canning supplies. The double row of planters definitely brings some life to an open wall, and I think that they’d be perfect for starting seedlings indoors come spring.

Haley Pierson-Cox

Brooklyn-based DIY from a Gal in Granny Glasses
http://www.thezenofmaking.com


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Comments

  1. brave canary says:

    DON’T DO IT! not only do herbs need lots more sunlight than your kitchen probably has, but those clear jars are going to let algae flourish no matter what light conditions they’re in. one month in and it’s gonna be a swampy green slimy smell-factory.
    clear jars are also going to let roots start to photosynthesize, which prevents them from doing the sorts of things that roots normally should do.
    plus, there’s no drainage! even if you put gravel or marbles or whatever on the bottom, you’ll end up with a perched water table, drowned roots and lots of sad dead plants.
    crafty people, you’re smarter than this!! don’t you have hearts? DON’T YOU WANT TO SPARE THOSE LITTLE HERBY LIVES?!

  2. thezenofmaking says:

    Brave Canary raises some good points. Depending on the kinds of plants you’re using, you could always line the insides of the jars with burlap to block unwanted light and fill the bottoms with stones for better drainage. It probably goes without saying that plants that need full light shouldn’t be placed in dark hallways, and you should be careful not to over-water when planting in jars with no bottom holes. :)
    -Haley at CRAFT

  3. Stacy says:

    I live in a very dry climate so algae is never a problem. All of my houseplants have ZERO drainage. These are not herbs. I was careful to choose houseplants that said “no direct light” since they would be near a room with lots of light but not IN the room with the light. Because the fact that they are clear jars, I can tell when the soil is dry and when it is wet. Over watering should not be an issue. But thank for your concern for my little plants. I do think that rock in the bottom would be a great idea and I love that my readers pointed that out.

  4. Tia says:

    Any suggestions for trying this in a tropical climate? Worried about the mold/algae issue. I think maybe orchids?? Super cool idea, thanks for sharing. :) aloha!

  5. Anne says:

    What about a bottom layer of pebbles then coal to act as drainage and filtration?

  6. Stacy says:

    I think as long as you don’t give it too much water it should be okay. Rocks at the bottom are a good idea :)

  7. janineknits says:

    I’m not that great with plants, but I’m thinking of an office/studio wall with knitting needles, crochet hooks, pencils, pens, markers, smaller or taller jars, etc – Thanks for the inspiration .

  8. janineknits says:

    I’m not that great with plants, but I’m thinking of an office/studio wall with knitting needles, crochet hooks, pencils, pens, markers, smaller or taller jars, etc – Thanks for the inspiration .

  9. Jen LC says:

    This would be kind of great with succulents, yes?

  10. Geannie says:

    I like the general idea but not for plants. No drainage would be a hugh problem. In a craft room it could be very useful to keep organized.

  11. I agree–it would be perfect for organizing little odds and ends in a craft room! -Haley on CRAFT

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