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CRAFT: Made for Dad
brookelynn'sdad.jpg
I’m a rebel. I’ve always tried to avoid picking up habits from my parents. What can I say? I’m just anti-authority and I love to teach myself. So despite almost 30 years of fighting it, I have finally realized you can’t always deny the effect your dad has on you. And for that, I consider myself to be quite lucky.
My dad, Steve Morris, is a crafty maker who invents, repairs and most of all, improves most things. He has introduced me to many adventerous hobbies, including welding and abalone diving. He loves to encourage my own work, and has even requested a needlefelted cuff for one of the handlebars on his Harley (I’m working on it dad!). I want to share three of the more important lessons I have learned from his diligent teaching (whether I wanted to learn them or not). These lessons might seem mundane, but they stick with me, and I often hear my dad’s voice while I’m working- generally reminders to be respectfull of my tools, and that shortcuts might not be the best way. Even though he didn’t teach me how to sew or felt, he taught me about crafting, and about the importance of having good form.
Dad Lesson 1: Everything is better in it’s original box.
My dad’s car battery charger is still in its original packaging, lending it an extra level of authenticity. He taught me that this is a great way to keep things tidy and secure, and I learned that over time, the original box also adds nostalgia to an otherwise mundane object.
Dad Lesson 2: Always keep the camera strap around your neck.
My dad’s Minolta camera is my favorite of his tools. When I was a kid, he generously let me use it- as long as I followed the only rule- WEAR THE STRAP. It’s a habit I still have, and the only reason I’ve never lost my camera off the Golden Gate Bridge.
Dad Lesson 3: Don’t pull on power cords.
I’ve always been a tiny bit lazy, and it took my dad’s vigilant instruction to break a very bad habit. I used to yank power cords right out of the wall, from the furthest possible distance. “What’s the harm?” I used to ask. Well, the outlet, the plug, and the sewing machine are all relieved that he made me walk over to the wall, every time.


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