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CRAFT: Super Crafty Kidz
How-To: No-Sew Apron
By Jessica Wilson


I have been wearing aprons since I was a wee cutie. I can say that because, seriously, I was one cute kid. When I was a wee one, I wore little pillowcase aprons my mother made for me, and when I was a teen I wore vintage aprons over my clothes. With skirts, with dresses, with pants, it didn’t matter. I loved aprons and I still do. The only problem is that even though I have a pretty swell collection and even though I wear them as often as I can, I always, always, ALWAYS forget to wear them when I am cooking. Go figure. Though I think it is because they are too cute and purdy to get food stuff on them, you know?
I love to make things — LOVE to, but I am far from being a good seamstress. Here is a nifty way to feed your apron habit without even sewing. The best part is you get to go thrift shopping for materials! And these instructions are so simple, your little ones can follow along and make their very own aprons.


No Sew Apron Materials

Materials

Cute kitchen curtain the kookier the better, and ruffles are a plus!
Ribbon, about 1″ wide and at least 1 yard
Iron-on fusible webbing or Dritz Stitch Witchery
Iron
Tape measure
Scissors
Safety pin

Directions

Step 1: The first thing you will need to do is wrap that tape measure around your waist to get your waist measurement. Once you have your number, you want to subtract 8″ to 12″ from it. This will be how wide you will cut your curtain.
Nosewapron Step2
Step 2: Cut your curtain. If your curtain is straight across, simply use your measuring tape to mark off your measurement and cut with your trusty scissors. If your curtain is curvy like the one in the picture, fold your curtain in half and measure out from the center on each side. Cut.
If you’re a curvy girl like me, wrap the curtain around your waist to determine whether or not you need to cut it. I cut mine 8″ in from each end.
Nosewapron Step3
Step 3: Examine the side of your curtain where you just cut. Do you see the casing for where the curtain rod went? This is where you are going to thread your ribbon, but first you need to pretty up the sides you just attacked with the scissors. To do this and to preserve the casing, use your scissors to cut in about 1″ from the end just under the casing. Make sure not to cut into the casing itself. Now do the other side.
Nosewapron Step4
Step 4: This is where you get to use the iron. If you’re knee high to a grasshopper, make sure you have an adult with you every step of the way and NEVER use the iron without supervision! Set yourself up on your ironing board or safe ironing surface. Look to where you just cut into your curtain under the casing. Fold that entire cut edge inwards with right side facing down. Fold until you “meet” where your cut ends. Give it a quick press with the iron to create a crease.
Nosewapron Step5B
Step 5: Roll out a length of fusible tape that matches the length of each side from just under the casing to the bottom hem. Slide it under the fold of fabric you just pressed so that it butts up against the crease. Iron the fold while making sure your fusible tape remains nicely sandwiched between the fabric. Repeat for the other side. You’re almost done!
Nosewapron Step6
Step 6: Time to add your apron strings! Pull out your ribbon and wrap it around your waist with enough left over to tie in a pretty bow, and cut it. Poke your safety pin through one end of the ribbon and thread it through the casing. If your ribbon is printed, make sure the printed side faces front. The safety pin acts as an anchor so you can feel the end of your ribbon as you smoosh and pull it through. You will have to find your rhythm for it but it involves pushing, gathering, and then pulling. Imagine an inchworm moving along.
Nowsewapron Final
Step 7: Trim the ends of your ribbon at an angle and put it on! Now it is time to put your apron to use — let’s make some cupcakes!
About the Author:
Author Jessicawilson
Jessica Wilson is most happily known as ‘jek in the box’ and spends most of her time crafting it up and taking pictures. She can often be found standing on benches over on Flickr and creating all sorts of kiddie crafts on her blog scrumdilly-do! She lives a life of scrumdillydilly and loves to share.


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