play- ladder toss
Picnics, tailgate parties, and other outdoor gatherings are great, but a little friendly competition makes things more interesting. You could buy a ladder toss set, but what fun is that? Here’s how you can make your own!

Steps

Step #1: Assemble the ladder

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Build a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVCBuild a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVCBuild a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVC
  • Press pipes into fittings as shown, using the 24" lengths for the ladder rungs (and feet) and the 12" pieces to form the vertical ladder rails.
  • You can press-fit it all, or you can use PVC cement on joints where you value rigidity over portability.

Step #2: Drill the bolas

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Build a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVCBuild a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVCBuild a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVCBuild a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVC
  • Drill a 3/16" hole through the center of each golf ball. A drill press with a vise is very helpful for securing the ball while drilling.
  • PRO TIP: To make a drilling jig that won’t mar the ball, drill a 1¾" hole through a scrap of 2×4, then saw it in half.

Step #3: Tie the bolas

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Build a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVC

Cut 6 lengths of cord to 21" and melt the ends to prevent fraying. Thread each cord through 2 golf balls and knot each end securely. To tell the difference between each set of 3 bolas, use 2 different color balls or cords.

Step #4: Play!

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Build a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVCBuild a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVCBuild a Simple Ladder Toss Game from PVC

Set up your ladder in an open area. Establish a toss line 15 feet (or 5 paces) from the ladder. The first player will toss 3 bolas, then the second will toss 3, with the objective to wrap them around rungs on the ladder. The top rung is worth 3 points, the middle 2, and the bottom 1. Games are generally played to 21 points, but “house” scoring variations are common. It’s oddly satisfying to see your golf balls wrap around a pipe — even more so if you’re competing with friends!

Jeremy S Cook

Jeremy S Cook

Jeremy is an engineer with 10 years experience at his full-time profession, and has a BSME from Clemson University. Outside of work he’s an avid maker and experimenter, building anything that comes into his mind!


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