Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!
screwpop.jpg

Now, there are a jillion combination pocket/keychain tools on the market. I’ve owned, carried, and used a bunch of them, and I generally find that only the test of time effectively sorts wheat from chaff. I’ve never owned, carried, or used this so-called “screwpop” tool, so I have no way of knowing how it stands up to pocket wear. I’d be a bit nervous that the reversible hex bit would get lost somewhere along the way, although it looks like their bit features a ball detent to hold it in place. Also, for those of you are counting, the “fourth” tool–besides the bottle opener and the flat and phillips screwdrivers–is a 1/4″ hex nut driver, which is a bit of a cheap marketing gimmick because what they’re really talking about, of course, is the socket that holds the hex bit.

But I like the no-frills design and the price is certainly right at $5. If I see one on a counter by a cashwrap at a hardware store someday, I’ll probably pick it up. [Thanks, Kurt!]

Sean Michael Ragan

I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I write for MAKE, serve as Technical Editor for MAKE magazine, and develop original DIY content for Make: Projects.


Related

Comments

  1. David Whitney says:

    At least they didn’t market it as a “5-in-1″ tool including the keychain loop.

  2. Nate says:

    I never did understand the need for carrying a bottle opener with me, all the time.

    The only time I’ve seen them come in “useful” is at a frat party…even then, they still had at least three openers in the kitchen, so it really only saved a few folks from getting off of the couch.

    Am I missing out on something, here?

    Maybe I just don’t drink enough while at work and/or driving?

    1. jason1729 says:

      I was at a photo shoot doing alcoholic drinks and we really needed a bottle opener for some European beer (I guess they’ve never heard of twist tops). Turned out to be a major headache since there wasn’t much in the way of tools in the studio.

  3. Sean Michael Ragan says:

    You’re completely right. From a strictly practical viewpoint, I find the less stuff I have bouncing around in my pockets, the better. But I also have whatever strange gene it is that really enjoys having the right tool in my pocket just when I need it.

    1. Nate says:

      That’s why I carry a satchel/messenger bag/murse/purse/whatevernameyouwanttogiveit that has my “emergency tools” :D

      Keys, phone and wallet all qualify as “emergency tools”. The only thing in my pockets is a pocket watch and lint. It’s a beautiful thing.

  4. Dave Hinerman says:

    The 1/4 inch nutdriver may sound like a marketing gimmick now, but back in the days when vacuum tube dinosaurs ruled the Earth that was the key to opening nearly any television set or radio.

    Coincidentally, those were also the days when pop and beer was most likely to come in glass bottles.

    I’ll bet the guy who designed this thing is an old coot like me.

  5. bond815 says:

    The most useful tool in my pocket has always been a knife. And my knife of choice is the best pocket tool ever invented – the Swiss Army knife. Mine has 10 different tools and includes everything this 4-in-1 has except the nut driver (a nut driver! really? Do people really have a lot of 1/4″ nuts that need tightened?)

    Not to mention (oops I just did) that the Swiss Army knife is comfortable in the pocket unlike this thing which I suspect will put a lot of holes in pockets and possibly even legs with that nice pointy screwdriver bit sticking out! Ouch!!

  6. Jamesmyname says:

    Looks interesting, but I think you’d be out of luck if you lost the bit.

    I’m not one to carry around a pocket knife. For me, the next best thing is my trusty Utilikey. At the size of a car key, it has a knife (partially serrated), phillips and slothead screwdriver, and bottle opener. It’s the perfect size. Not bulky at all.

  7. Kurt Roedeger says:

    You’re welcome Sean!