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3D Systems

With wi-fi printing and OK print quality, the reliable, easty-to-use Cube makes a move for the mainstream.

Torture test print. Click to view large.

WHEN YOU THINK ABOUT HOBBYIST 3D PRINTING, the name “3D Systems” doesn’t immediately come to mind. The company is trying to change that with the Cube, its recent entry into the low-end fused-filament fabrication market.

To read the full review, buy the Make: Ultimate Guide to 3D Printing.

2013 MAKE Ultimate Guide To 3D Printing

  • 3D Printers Buyer's Guide — 15 Reviewed
  • Getting Started in 3D
  • Learn the Software Toolchain
  • 3D Design for Beginners
  • 3D Printing without a Printer

Buy now!

Just Released! 2014 MAKE Ultimate Guide To 3D Printing

We want to hear from you! Share your experiences with this machine, what you like, what you don't like, where you think our test team got it wrong. We hope you’ll join in the discussion. We’d also love to see the things that you design and print out.

  • Primo Features Wireless printing, touchscreen interface, great manual, easy filament install, “magic glue”
  • Print volume 5.5″×5.5″×5.5″
  • Print speed 15mm3/sec
  • Print material ABS (proprietary cartridge)
  • Resolution (z-axis) 0.01″/0.25mm (10mm)
  • Machine software Cubify Client Software
  • Slicing software Cubify Client Softwarer
  • OS supported Windows(XP/SP3, Vista, 7)
  • Open Source No
  • Price as tested $1,299 assembled
  • Pedigree Similar to PP3DP Up
  • Print without PC? Yes, wi-fi, USB stick
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Comments

  1. mark says:

    Now that they have filed suit against Formlabs and Kickstarter these losers have shown they do not belong in the maker movement.

  2. tps says:

    well, most anyone who has been following 3d printing knows that the Cube is a ripoff of the Up! 3D printer…

  3. It is really great achievement in engineering designs and developments

    1. mark says:

      They wrote a patent about how to stack layers so it wouldn’t slump, paid some shyster to file it and then screemed DIBBS!!!
      Face it, the patent system is a failure in the modern world. None of the patents issued are really new ideas, just idiots trying to plant a flag.
      Heh, I invented the number 3 so don’t you dare use it!!!
      morons.

    2. mark says:

      They wrote a patent about how to stack layers so it wouldn’t slump, paid some shyster to file it and then screamed DIBBS!!!
      Face it, the patent system is a failure in the modern world. None of the patents issued are really new ideas, just idiots trying to plant a flag.
      Heh, I invented the number 3 so don’t you dare use it!!!

  4. Chris says:

    This is a solid little printer. It is *very* simple to use. There are barely any “knobs” to tweak. It’s good for someone that just wants to reliably print things without babysitting the printer. The ABS does have warping issues even with the heat bed. The big problem is the “razor blade” model. The printer is not that expensive, but they charge $49/0.7lbs of filament! (compare to $31/2.2lbs of Octave 1.75mm filament). That’s 5X the price!

    1. Chris says:

      It turns out there is a way you can use spool filament instead of the expensive proprietary 3D System cartridges (http://www.howmuchsnow.com/cube)

  5. david gentner says:

    The cube is a piece of crap. It prints about 1 out of 4. The plastic doesn’t stick to gather. Most pieces warp. The cube ext. is another way to have to use the cube software. All in all the worst first printer.

    1. Jim Braselton says:

      David is right. Personally, I love the machine. But, usually to get a good print takes two or three tries. That does waste a lot of resources. He is right: you have to make one or two prints that may not turn out well until the second, third or fourth turns out perfect. I try to manage the machine when it is starting a new print. David is right–at the least you have to supervise what is going on if you want the results you expect.

  6. Jim Braselton says:

    I love my Cube. But, I think their shipping charges are *excessively* high for new supplies. By this I mean a few weeks ago I shipped back 4 cartridges for their recycling program. That cost $13.10. I am supposed to receive a credit of $5.00 per cartridge. After the math, you can see I may have saved $6.90, but we’ll forget about the extra trip to the post office and the credit didn’t appear on my account when I ordered today. More difficult for me to digest. Just bought 3 new cartridges and a few bottles of glue for the platform. Shipping costs were $75+. I am not kidding. If they put them in a USPS Priority Mail Box, the cost will be a lot less than $75. I am disappointed.

  7. […] it’s predecessors, the Cube and Cube 2, the Cube 3 is closed-source, has a touchscreen interface and comes without a heated […]

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