Subscribe to Make Magazine Today!

Mint-Tin Software Defined Radio

Screen shot 2013-01-23 at 11.13.06 AM

Steve, AKA Flickr user 3dking, built this mint-tin, PCB-less(!) SDR upverter, which switches your software-controlled Ham radio from VHF to HF. I built another up-converter, this time in to an Altoids tin and stuck a low quality label on the tin lid. This version includes the switching relay to connect... Read more »

Mod a Mini Rover with Weekend Projects

  • By
  • 12/21/2012 @ 9:17 am
  • Category Uncategorized
fla2enFM3HJaaiKT

Combine a remote-controlled (R/C) vehicle with some surveillance equipment to create your own terrestrial rover. Turn your rover into a game, explore the neighborhood, or challenge a friend to a real-world race over wireless video! Read more »

Everyone’s the DJ with Autonomous Interactive Radio

IMG_0920

Reid Bingham and Sean McIntyre, the duo behind Double One Design, created Autonomous Interactive Radio (AIR for short). It’s a Raspberry Pi-based DJ system which accepts MP3 files via email and enqueues them to be played out through the audio output. The project was their work for Interactivos, a ten... Read more »

Teleclaw: Remote Robot Gripper

Image (6) teleclaw-600x450.jpg for post 104855

It might have been Robots of Saturn that first got my young brain thinking about building a mechanical man. In that obscure 1962 sci-fi adventure novel, Dig Allen and his fellow teenage space explorers transfer their thoughts into the bodies of teleoperated robots to mine Saturn’s dangerous rings for precious... Read more »

Bug-in-a-Book

In this fun and easy project (which originally appeared in the Spy Tech edition of Make Magazine), you’ll connect a shirt-pocket “amplified listener” hearing aid with an in-car FM transmitter to create a wireless bug. Then you’ll tuck them inside a hollowed-out book with the microphone (mic) concealed by the... Read more »

Micro FM Transmitter

This circuit is commonly credited to Japanese multimedia artist Tetsuo Kogawa. It takes audio input through a 1/4″ phono jack and, constructed as shown, without the optional antenna connections, will broadcast an FM radio signal about 30 feet. This is the standard model of Mr. Kogawa’s simplest FM transmitter, which... Read more »