Science
Make your Own Hologram Kit

holo.jpgMSNBC’s Gary Krakow got the DIY bug and made some holograms using the Litholo hologram kit. The article explains what holograms are, how they’re made and special “instant hologram film” used to make the home versions. Usually holograms require that there be no motion at all, but the home kit from Litholo gets around that and from what the article says, produces great results! Link.

0 thoughts on “Make your Own Hologram Kit

  1. I bought this hologram kit from litiholo.com and it didn not work anywhere near as advertised (or hardly at all, to be precise). I found out I wasn’t the only who had many of the same problems and complaints, when I joined the holographyforum.org discussion groups. Apparently, the company has a lot of customer service problems also (i.e. not returnign emails, phone calls). Members of the holographyforum suggested I try other holography kits out there, which seem to work much better.

  2. This kit is for transmission holograms– that’s a type that is only viewable with a laser beam. Beginners are certainly better off making reflection holograms, which can be viewed with white light. Several companies make reflection hologram kits, but they don’t use instant film; you need a real developing step. (“Instant” types of film are available, but usually require high-power (expensive) lasers.) A good starter kit is available from Integraf.

  3. I’d have to agree with the comments above. I actually tried the liti kit and the holokit from Integraf.

    Here’s the deal. Integraf’s kit gives you the essentials so you make decent holograms (reflection, transmission, and even multi-mage and inteferometry holograms). I succeeded after in making hologram within the first hour and after using only 2 holographic plates. Out of the kit (which included 30 plates), I ended up making over 20+ decent holograms! Using the chemical developers was actually quite easy and fast. According to their website (http://www.holokits.com), the kits are most popular among teachers, students, and hobbyists. I learned alot from this kit and feel like I can move on to even more advanced holographic projects. It seems like lots of holographers at online holography discussion groups also started with this kit (and still say it is the kit to start with).

    As for the Liti kit, I had a much, much, much harder time making a hologram. It took me nearly two hours to get anything at all, and used eight plates before I even got an image. The image quality was so weak I could hardly see it. The kit is really for someone who must absolutely avoid chemicals, and is probably geared more as a “toy” or gimmick gift for a young child (but I wonder how much patience that child will have.)

    Based on what I’ve read, the reason Integraf’s kit works better is because its film and developer process is pretty much what the professionals use. Liti’s kit, in contrast, uses a film that requires much more laser light to make things happen (like 100 times more!), so exposure times are about 100 times more (yes, I needed to expose over 10 minutes to get even a faint image). Making an analogy to using a camera, if one were to expose photographic film for 10 minutes, there’s like much more blur in picture to happen, due to movement. In holography, blur doesn’t happen, but rather you get a completely blank hologram. You can’t even move like 1/100,000 of an inch. That’s really hard to do if Liti’s film requires 10 minutes to make even a faint image.

    So, that’s my two cents. Basically, go with the Integraf holokit if you want to make real holograms, and go with Liti if you just absolutely, positively must avoid chemicals and would be satisfied eeking out 1 faint hologram, if any.

  4. I’ll have to chime in the other commenter’s responses to say also that the liti kit is a waste of time. The only thing you can count on is that it will disappoint.
    Don’t take my word for it though, check with the other holographers at the Holography Forum and then go out and get a kit from Integraf/holokits. They’ve stood by their products for a long time and you can count on them.
    Michael Harrison

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