Computers & Mobile

TreoPretty unfortunate. I suspect we’ll see a hack to work around this soon – “So you just bought a Windows Mobile Treo with EV-DO service and you want to use it as a modem for your laptop? Forget it. Verizon Wireless says you must buy a second 3G subscription and they have the technology to back it up. Specifically, while the device, which has well-reviewed, comes with Bluetooth, Verizon has disabled the Bluetooth dial-up networking capability that would enable the Treo 700w to act as a modem for laptops.” Link.

20 thoughts on “Verizon Prevents Treo Use As 3G Modem

  1. Same thing with the “LG the V” phone. I took back my LG phone when I figured this out and got a Motorola E815, which you can easily “hack” (just dial a special code really) to allow bluetooth DUN.

    You can even enable OBEX stuff with this phone if you get a USB cable and follow a bunch of steps in some online tutorials.

    I highly recommend the E815 for Makers.

  2. this is why when i got a treo, i ditched verizon and joined sprint. yeah their network coverage isnt as wide, but i get bluetooth DUN, unlimited data and i was able to load my contacts into my prius no sweat. verizon sucks!

  3. My brother bought one of these yesterday and he is able to network via his bluetooth laptop and get out to the net at broadband speed. He is using the new beta of PDANet and he says it works great and he is on Verizon. You can get it here.

  4. I live and work in the Middle East but am from the USA. I hear my friends here gripe about their service providers that make them pay for bluetooth transfers, minutes-per-month plans, bad coverage, etc…

    In Qatar I pay a security deposit and then my mobile phone is billed like a landline phone. I pay for the calls I make—no limits and have full access to all my Nokia 6230’s features (like bluetooth) without being billed for it.

    The coverage in Qatar is good (albeit a small country) but it is also an all digital network. The USA is a mix of analog/digital because the companies that put up the analog towers are trying to ring every dollar out before they have to replace them. The USA is behind in the cell phone market considerably…don’t believe me? Check out http://www.nokia.com website and click on the Middle East. I’ll bet you’ll find phones that you haven’t even heard of over here.

    I bought my buddy a Nokia 6600 cellphone while I was in Qatar and brought it back for him. It works fine over here and his bluetooth chip wasn’t disabled and he isn’t billed when he transfers his photos, movies, music, etc…

  5. I live and work in the Middle East but am from the USA. I hear my friends here gripe about their service providers that make them pay for bluetooth transfers, minutes-per-month plans, bad coverage, etc…

    In Qatar I pay a security deposit and then my mobile phone is billed like a landline phone. I pay for the calls I make—no limits and have full access to all my Nokia 6230’s features (like bluetooth) without being billed for it.

    The coverage in Qatar is good (albeit a small country) but it is also an all digital network. The USA is a mix of analog/digital because the companies that put up the analog towers are trying to ring every dollar out before they have to replace them. The USA is behind in the cell phone market considerably…don’t believe me? Check out http://www.nokia.com website and click on the Middle East. I’ll bet you’ll find phones that you haven’t even heard of over here.

    I bought my buddy a Nokia 6600 cellphone while I was in Qatar and brought it back for him. It works fine over here and his bluetooth chip wasn’t disabled and he isn’t billed when he transfers his photos, movies, music, etc…

  6. I live and work in the Middle East but am from the USA. I hear my friends here gripe about their service providers that make them pay for bluetooth transfers, minutes-per-month plans, bad coverage, etc…

    In Qatar I pay a security deposit and then my mobile phone is billed like a landline phone. I pay for the calls I make—no limits and have full access to all my Nokia 6230’s features (like bluetooth) without being billed for it.

    The coverage in Qatar is good (albeit a small country) but it is also an all digital network. The USA is a mix of analog/digital because the companies that put up the analog towers are trying to ring every dollar out before they have to replace them. The USA is behind in the cell phone market considerably…don’t believe me? Check out http://www.nokia.com website and click on the Middle East. I’ll bet you’ll find phones that you haven’t even heard of over here.

    I bought my buddy a Nokia 6600 cellphone while I was in Qatar and brought it back for him. It works fine over here and his bluetooth chip wasn’t disabled and he isn’t billed by Verizon when he transfers his photos, movies, music, etc…

  7. I have a question about blue tooth. do you have to pay monthly for it or does it come with the phone when it is purchased. I am trying to send mp3 files from my computer to my phone using a bluetooth USB, but it keeps saying not supported. what does this mean?

  8. I have a Vx8550 and i got a question about blue tooth. do you have to pay monthly for it or does it come with the phone when it is purchased. I am trying to send mp3 files from my computer to my phone using a bluetooth USB, but it keeps saying not supported. what does this mean?

  9. I hear that BT file sharing is not supported on the 8550 at least not out of the box. Most are manually adding files to mini card using a cable to their PC. The other BT functions are enabled.

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