Super Grip your stuff with Plasti Dip

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Here’s how to “Super-Grip” all sorts of things, including game controllers – [via] Link.

12 thoughts on “Super Grip your stuff with Plasti Dip

  1. Oh come on. Grip-Dip is one of the single most useless products on the planet. It does stick and look pretty for a little while, but it doesn’t last.

    Let me digress. Once upon a time, I was a techie in a theater scene shop. The theater’s technical director (the scene shop boss) was a singularly inept twit, who was eventually fired for his lack of having any sort of a grip at all (ironic, isn’t it?).

    At some point in his tenure, he decided to grip-dip all of our hand tools. He even grip-dipped a set of color-coded nut drivers. Oh, the humanity! They looked nice for maybe a week before they started to peel. For years afterwards, we would find ourselves sharing a joke with one another, and realize that we were all absent-mindedly peeling off bits of the remaining grip-dip from whatever tools we had in our hands at the time.

    The only part of it that lasts is the regret of having used it in the first place.

  2. Ditto on the crappy durability of this product. I have used it in dozens of different applications and it always peels pretty quickly. Using more/thicker coats simply means it peels in bigger chunks.

    I have had more luck in using a spray can of pickup truck bet liner from Wal-store (Look in automotive). Its not rubbery and it leaves a shiny but textured surface that is way more durable (but still not bulletproof). I used in on the DIY halogen bike light posted here a few days ago and it looks great.

  3. Ditto on the crappy durability of this product. I have used it in dozens of different applications and it always peels pretty quickly. Using more/thicker coats simply means it peels in bigger chunks.

    I have had more luck in using a spray can of pickup truck bed liner from Wal-store (Look in automotive). Its not rubbery and it leaves a shiny but textured surface that is way more durable (but still not bulletproof). I used in on the DIY halogen bike light posted here a few days ago and it looks great.

  4. Heat shrink tubing might be another option if it is a fairly thin, long object. I did it once on a handmade lockpick, and it worked alright. I don’t use it much, so I’m not too sure if it’s really durable either.

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