Fun & Games Technology
LEGO lie detector

Gsr
Nice Make! – “You can’t get more simple than the Galvanic Skin Response GSR sensor. It is just a cut 9V LEGO motor wire and some aluminum foil wrapped around your fingers with tape. I was inspired by talks by Mindfest panelists Karen Wilkinson and Mike Petrich who talked about using this type of sensor.” [via] – Link.

Related:

  • More LEGO project than you could shake a brick at – Link.
  • LEGO projects from the pages of MAKE! – Link.

12 thoughts on “LEGO lie detector

  1. Yep. Only problem is this one’s been around for oh, probably going on 7 years ;)

    Good post though, keep folks informed about what they could be doing :)

  2. There is a small, hand-held and self contained GSR2 which has sold a half a million units and is already the largest selling Galvanic Skin Response monitoring device for home biofeedback. The GSR2 precisely monitors your stress levels by translating tiny tension-related changes in skin pores into a rising or falling tone. By resting two fingers on the sensing plates you learn to lower the pitch and your stress level.

    The GSR Temp 2X also includes a temperature sensor for monitoring heat levels in extremities. Stress also reduces blood flow to the hands, causing cooling. The GSR/Temp 2X home biofeedback system allows you to do “hand warming” biofeedback in addition to training with the GSR2 monitor, temperature sensor, body sensors for hands-free use, dual-sensitivity meter, earphone, instruction manual and a cassette with a short relaxation program.

    There is also CalmLink Biofeedback Software for Windows, or CalmLink, is specifically designed to run with GSR2 and GSR2/Temp2X devices. CalmLink works in Windows 98/98SE, ME, 2000 and XP. The main requirement is SoundBlaster compatible sound card. GSR2 connects to a computer Sound card via Microphone in jack.

    There are also 12 Behavioral Programs from leading clinicians from major medical institutions. Check it out at http://www.mindgrowth.com

Comments are closed.

Tagged

current: @adafruit - previous: MAKE, popular science, hackaday, engadget, fallon, braincraft ... howtoons, 2600...

View more articles by Phillip Torrone