Craft & Design
HOW TO – Silkscreen posters and shirts

Ssapdone
Shannon writes – “Silkscreening is such a great happy medium — nestled comfortably half-way between hand-drawn and mass production, more colourful than photocopying and with an aesthetic all its own. Artist Shannon Gerard broke out her silkscreening gear to make cool shirts and posters for her upcoming comic launch, and despite being crazy busy has shared her skills in this funny and detailed tutorial. Read on to learn how to print your own posters, shirts, or whatever you fancy printing on, and how the Virgin Mary and Spiderman join forces to help her out.”Link.

8 thoughts on “HOW TO – Silkscreen posters and shirts

  1. Very nice. Silkscreening is something every maker should try at some point. I bought a speedball t-shirt kit a while back and played around trying to make some shirts to sell on my website. I couldn’t get the quality anywhere near what I’d be willing to wear in public and I finally paid a pro, but the fun I had trying on my own was well worth it.

    Since I had the equipment I printed my logo on a bunch of those colorful pocketed folders you can get for 10 cents at back to school time. They came out looking good.

  2. if anyone wants more info on screen printing, my friend is a professional printer and is obsessed with the process. he screen prints everything from shirts and crap for work to the envelopes he mails letters in. he wrote an extremely detailed little zine about how to setup to do professional quality prints in your own house, check it out at http://www.tenfortyfivepress.com

  3. Does he screen print the destination address or just the return address? It took me around an hour to make a screen, then each time I used it, it took an hour of set-up and clean up and about 30 seconds per print.

    The amount of overhead time is insane compared to actually doing the prints. I can’t imagine doing it 1-off like a destination address.

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