Craft & Design
HOW TO – Make a Key-Glove

Keyglove Worn
Here’s how to make a super-cheap wearable “key-glove” using nickel snap ons, a leather glove and a keyboard – [via] – Link.

21 thoughts on “HOW TO – Make a Key-Glove

  1. Wow, yeah I did this little project yesterday. I had no idea it’d be such a hit, I’ll try to get some better pictures up soon.

  2. Don’t think the fish will last that long without a little fresh air getting to the surface of the water. Just a thought.. cool idea.

  3. The base of the bulb is open and should allow enough air for a single fish. I wouldn’t try this with a goldfish or otherwise though, to the best of my knowledge, goldfish won’t go to the surface for air and need more surface area on the water to allow oxygen in.

  4. how did you get the fish IN there?
    lol

    as for oxygen problem? simple solution, use an old fish tank air pump or buy one at a garage sale and run the tube into the bulb lol …but betas really dont need oxygen more oxygen in fact hurts them…

  5. As to how I got Edison in the bulb, it wasn’t as hard as I thought it could be. I set up a simple funnel, and poured him in (very gently) with a little water. The opening is 3/4 of an inch, not huge, but not too tight a sqeeze for a small beta fish. Also, changing the water wasn’t too hard, I just poured out about half of it, and funneled new treated water in. I would like to get a larger bulb eventually but I’m having trouble finding one. I’ll also try to post a tutorial this weekend. Until then, if you try to do this please remember to use hot glue or something to cover the inside of the opening in the screw, you don’t want to cut your fish (or yourself)

  6. As to how I got Edison in the bulb, it wasn’t as hard as I thought it could be. I set up a simple funnel, and poured him in (very gently) with a little water. The opening is 3/4 of an inch, not huge, but not too tight a sqeeze for a small beta fish. Also, changing the water wasn’t too hard, I just poured out about half of it, and funneled new treated water in. I would like to get a larger bulb eventually but I’m having trouble finding one. I’ll also try to post a tutorial this weekend. Until then, if you try to do this please remember to use hot glue or something to cover the inside of the opening in the screw, you don’t want to cut your fish (or yourself)

    And yes, it looks like this is ONLY suitable for a beta fish. Please don’t tourture goldfish.

    1. This is a cool as idea! I dunno yet if I’ll make a terrarium or aquarium, but everyone’s under the impression that you can’t keep a goldfish in a bowl? I’m not pretending to be an expert, but I kept my fantail, Mucky, in a plain fish bowl for over a year and he was always very happy and active. The pet store owner at Stoddard’s told me himself that goldfish and betas are really the only fish you can keep in bowls, that’s the only reason I chose Mucky. If I do the aquarium bulb though, I’ll use a beta simply because they’re smaller and usually better suited for such a small space.

  7. Smaller bowls encourage a more attractive fish because more of their energy goes to their appearance– not saying this is the “right” way to keep a betta, but it is a fact.

    Another fact– the betta gill organs do not work like that of a regular fish. no matter how high the oxygen level in the water, if the betta cannot breathe surface air into its labyrinth lung, it will suffocate. Stand the thing up and take the silver part off, and the fish should be fine.

    Change the water alot, because the small amount will get toxic quickly– way before it gets cloudy. Betta evolved in rice paddies, so if you can keep it pretty warm, that’s ideal. A cool environment can kill a betta or at least shorten its life. Part of having a cool tank is not having to replace the tennant every three weeks ;)

  8. phorcys,

    Thanks for the support. The silver top actually is open at the base. Take a look at this picture from John’s project on how to hollow out a lightbulb to see what I mean. As for the water, so far it looks like I may have to empty 1/3 of it out and replace it every day to keep it clean. I’ve been doing this by treating a gallon of tap water and keeping it in the same room as the bowl to make sure it’s at the same temperature. Each day I syphon out about 1/3 of the water and replace it with clean water from this jug.

    You seem to know what you’re talking about, if there’s anything I should do to improve my caretaking, I’d love to hear it. Also, I’m considering adding a small plant. I understand it’s good for stress if fish to have a place to hide. Any recomendations? I’d prefer a live plant, but whatever is best for the fish is my biggest interest. The “bowl” is about 7 inches in diameter, if that helps the decision.

  9. If you’re looking to improve the life of that fish then take it out of that lightbulb. The reccommended space for a betta is one gallon. I’ll admit that that light bulb is quite an idea but that fish will die in there unless you move him out of it. Bettas are also tropical fish, meaning they prefer water temperatures of 78-80 degrees F.

    Bettas love plants, live or otherwise. Plastic isnt reccommended because it can tear up their fins. Go with silk if you’d rather do fake plants.

    electronicmaji – I dont know who told you that line of BS about bettas and oxygen but they’re wrong. Adding a bubbler to a tank wont harm a betta. It’s helpful for when medication as some meds leech oxygen from the water and can stress out the fish.

    Good luck.

  10. He seems to like it? Why, because he hasn’t died yet? What on earth gives you the idea that he likes it?

    Maybe you should actually do some reading on betta (not beta) fish before getting one. Even just doing a freaking Google/Wikipedia search will show you that the little bowls they’re kept in are far from ideal housing.
    You’ve seen “worse”? That’s your justification? I’ve seen a lot of fish in crappy tanks– also dogs tied to kennels their whole lives, malnourished cats, rabbits given to little kids at Easter and then never cared for. Does that mean I should just perpetuate the inhumane treatment by keeping my own pets that way?

    I suppose this is where you retort that it’s “just a fish.” If it’s just a fish, maybe you should reconsider having one as a “pet” and put a fake fish in your… lightbulb.
    I cannot believe I even have to write this. You’re keeping a fish in a fucking lightbulb.

  11. *sigh*
    Sorry for chewing you out. It’s just a huuuuge issue for me, the way these fish are treated. :/ There’s so much misinformation about them that it seems like it will never get better.

    I kept my first betta in a little rubbermaid container before I found out they don’t actually like small spaces. Back then I probably would have thought this was really cute… but it’s really not fair to the fish. :/

  12. Where can I get a light bulb like that. I looked at our lights but couldnt take the metal off. I was wondering if he fish is still alive??

  13. And for the record, that bulb looks plenty big enough for that fish. There are some BIG bulbs out there, it doesn’t have to be the usual ‘small as your palm’ bulb size. I just don’t get all this crap about the bulb being cruel to the fish… Just use a bigger bulb. It looks badass.

  14. I guess my other comment never posted, but what I had originally typed was that I kept my fantail, Mucky, in a glass bowl for over a year and he was always very happy and active. The owner of Stoddard’s Pets told me himself that beta and goldfish are pretty much the only fish you can keep in a bowl successfully. I’m not pretending to be an expert or anything, I’m just saying, my experience was a success.

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