Craft & Design
Pop Up Paper

Popuppaper

Jens writes, “Make a pop-up paper, a folded paper that unfolds when you open it!
Great for maps etcetera that should fit in a pocket.
Link.

16 thoughts on “Pop Up Paper

  1. We need more diagrams or something – I cannot follow the “trickiest” part. It’s unclear how the fold is made, and how you end up with rectangular creases. I ended up with a diagonal across the corner – I must be doing something wrong.

    Other than not being able to do it this looks really nice! I’ve got an example at home of a “brochure” which folds to pocket size as well. Both are really great.

  2. I was at a restaurant that had this for their menus.. pretty clever, and aesthetically pleasing to boot.

    Even as a grown up, I still like pop-up books.

  3. It looks very nice. There’s a company that makes maps that have 2 fold-outs each like this on a cardboard backing.

    I have to agree with Bloo though, the instructions are hard to follow.

  4. Thank you for your comments.

    I have tried to clarify the part where you make the corner folds. I have also added an image where I try to show upwards/furrow and downwards/ridge folds.

    Hope this will help.
    /Jens

  5. This fold is also known as map fold and has existed for a long time. If you need to find the diagrams, try finding a book called “Complete Origami” by Eric Kenneway. It is basically a waterbomb base in the middle and followed by 4 reverse folds.

    And, to Oracle1729, yeah the Map Group Inc published the PopOut Maps. They are quite handy.

  6. If anyone has purchased a map of downtown chicago (from one of those curios shops in the sears tower) you notice that it is folded in exactly the same way, complete with hard card board glued to the two outer sides.

  7. I believe it is called Turkish Map Fold, I have seen several good guides with squares (try Google) – it will be interesting to try to apply it on a rectangle :)

  8. Does anyone have any detail about this Folding map format/Turkish map form? I have the Complete Origami (p106) by Eric Kenneway but he mentions it as a Dutch cartographic company’s invention from around WWII but others trace it back thousands of years. Anyone able to clarify?

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