Technology

Update: It appears that the site we linked to removed the source / where this project came from, so we’ve removed the diagram and text until we find out what’s going on…

20 thoughts on “LED Temperature thermometer project

  1. What is the source of this project? The diagram looks like it was taken from one of the Gernsback magazines (Radio-Electronics, Electronics Now, or the second incarnation of Popular Electronics), in which case it’s copyrighted. At least an acknowledgment would be welcome.

  2. Judging from its style, this diagram appears to be from one of the Gernsback magazines (Radio-Electronics, Electronics Now, or the second incarnation of Popular Electronics).

    If so, it’s copyrighted. Please at least give the original author credit. Technically, permission from the copyright holder is probably required in order to post the diagram.

    Michael Covington
    Former contributing editor, Gernsback Publications
    (No present business connection to Gernsback)

  3. micheal..it says “electronics project design” – that is the linked web site (check out the site) there isn’t any other information.

  4. I know the second incarnation of popular electronics did a project like this. My guess would be this is it.

    I have every issue except the last 18 months or so (it got really bad at the end), but they’re in boxes 2000 miles away from me right now so I can’t look it up.

  5. Yes, the schematic was extracted from Popular Electronics. I have been trying to get in touch with Gernsback publication but the site
    has now become a resource directory. See http://www.gernsback.com

    According to EPE Online, the Popular Electronics magazine collapsed towards the end of 1999 and were merged into a new magazine called Poptronics, which is no longer in business http://www.poptronics.com

    Due to these, I am not able to contact the owner with regards to copyright and am not sure who to give credit to. Hence, I did not include the source in the project.

  6. Yes, the schematic was extracted from Popular Electronics. I have been trying to get in touch with Gernsback publication but the site
    has now become a resource directory. See http://www.gernsback.com

    According to EPE Online, the Popular Electronics magazine collapsed towards the end of 1999 and were merged into a new magazine called Poptronics, which is no longer in business http://www.poptronics.com

    Due to these, I am not able to contact the owner with regards to copyright and am not sure who to give credit to. Hence, I did not include the source in the project.

  7. Thanks for your response, Michael. But I don’t think you’ve realized what a powderkeg this could be.

    Even if Gernsback has abandoned the copyrights (which I don’t think they have), you owe them and the original author, the courtesy of indicating whose work it is and where it was originally published.

    Most authors welcome it when people cite their work, giving them credit. But if you copy someone else’s work without giving credit, passing it off as your own, that is both unethical (plagiarism) and illegal (copyright law violation); you can expect copyright holders to come out fighting.

    I’m in favor of free, open sharing of information. That includes being honest about who wrote, drew, and designed things.

  8. By the way, to answer your question, give credit to Popular Electronics, such-and-such issue and pages, and give the title and author of the article.

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