Technology
Programming PIC microcontrollers in BASIC

Easypic3-500
MAKE reader Russtang just picked up one of these Microchip PIC development tools with a USB 2.0 programmer on board, he writes “They have their own version of basic for $149 ($99 with purchase of their board). They have C and pascal compilers. They also have a good (FREE) “Programming Basic for Microcontrollers” tutorial here –

“Learn how to write your own program, debug it, and use it to start the microcontroller. We have provided plenty of practical examples with necessary connection schemes: temperature sensors, AD and DA converters, LCD and LED displays, relays, communications, and the book is constantly being updated with fresh examples. All code is commented in details to make it easier for beginners. Instruction set, operators, control structures, and other elements of BASIC are thoroughly explained with many examples. Also, the book includes a useful appendix on mikroBasic development environment: how to install it and how to use it to its full potential.”Link.

Previous:
PIC microcontrollers – a beginner’s guide – Link.

12 thoughts on “Programming PIC microcontrollers in BASIC

  1. That board is $116, it seems like a great deal for someone looking to get into pic programming. I would have guessed about $500.

    Those headers on the right also connect to optional daugher boards like a real-time clock, an SD card reader, etc, which are also very reasonably priced.

  2. i have one of these, and it is AWESOME. The fastest programmer I have ever used.

    Don’t immediately dismiss it. Its a fantastic board.

  3. I don’t have the dev board, but the software has been a great product, at least in the year or two since I bought it. They have frequent updates, wide range of device support, and a significant library of functions. Their user forum has always had high-level experts offering assistance as well as company techs that contribute as needed.

    If you don’t want to shell out cash for the software, all of their products are free for personal use as long as the hex file is under 2kb. That fits most of the hobby projects that I have ever done.

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