Make Podcast: Weekend Projects – DIY T-Shirt Designs

In celebration of the new craftzine magazine and blog, I have created a podcast to teach three ways to make your own t-shirt designs.

Shirt2

When you make your own tshirt designs upload them to the craft flickr pool!

Make sure to go check out the instructional post too!

Click here to get the video (MP4) delivered automatically with iTunes. This video will play on PC/Mac/Linux/PSPs and iPod video devices. Also for your viewing pleasure – HD, 3gp, 3g2, Youtube, Google, and Blip.

14 thoughts on “Make Podcast: Weekend Projects – DIY T-Shirt Designs

  1. Whats with the horrible quality? the picture is very small and the camera is too far out, please use a higher resolution next time so people who watch this dont have to squint to see what he’s doing. Video made for a 1.8″ screen is a horrible Idea, publish it in 640 x 480 , thats a nice smallish size that people veiwing it on monitors can see.

    its a shame, this was going to be as good as the kite one you guys did a few weeks back.

  2. Heh, I should have just put this with the above comment but maybe one week (preferably soon) you could cover silkscreening. its not all that difficult but I havent seena video guide yet.

    also for anyone that wants to try the bleech method I recomend taking a sheet of freezer paper and putting it on the inside of the shirt so your bleech doesnt soak through leaving the back of the shirt blotched

  3. Cool. It’s nice to have a stockpile of quick projects.

    Another way to make T shirts is iron on transfer sheets that work in ink jet printers. Reverse your design using MS Paint or your favorite graphics editor, print it on the transfer sheet, iron it.

    Bre’s tips for iron on lettering will help.

  4. Bre,
    Looks like you have the free arm version of my machine (I’m completely jealous of that, by the way). If you should find yourself without a spring foot for your next project, just adjust the foot tension–open up the side door, above the needle and turn the knob marked NORM past the minus sign, all the way around to DARN. As long as you don’t need to do perfect, pretty swirls, you can do this with the feed dogs (fabric feeder feet) still exposed. If you should decide that you need perfect, pretty swirls, you’ll need a needle plate that covers the feed dogs.

    Hope this can save you some money/time in the future :)

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