Coleman’s military surplus

Make 331
Erik writes –

Hey, I was browsing around yesterday and found this site. They carry a TON of cool things for Makers all around. for instance, military grade ammunition boxs/cans of all kinds and insanely low prices (i.e $10 for full metal ammo boxes) Along with 24$ Geiger counters as well as all sorts of tactical gear. Thought you might be interested as I can already think of quite a few projects I could use this with.

Ammo cans for $10 are pretty good (and really useful) I’ve also had luck scoring them looking around in the trash on moving days each month in cities too.

Coleman’s Military Surplus – Link.

26 thoughts on “Coleman’s military surplus

  1. A little correction – those “geiger counters” are not geiger counters (I own some of them). They’re ion chambers, intended to be used in conjunction with a geiger counter. They work on a different principle, and will not start to register any reading until radiation levels are so high that a geiger counter would fail to operate reliably. Originally, they often came as a matching set with a geiger counter, but the geiger counters are more valuable and have presumably been sold off seperately.

  2. Wait, their item #346601 is a geiger counter, but is in non-working condition and costs $50. But this is great site. Thanks.

  3. $10 for an ammo can?! Boo. You can get them at Army/Navy stores for much cheaper. The .50 caliber cans normally cost around $6 and the .30 cal cost around $5.

    $10 plus all that extra cash for shipping is an obscene amount of money for an ammo can. Ask any Geocacher and they will be able to find a good price locally for you.

  4. Ammo cans are fantastic – Vax is right on about the pricing and stuff.

    I bought two cans from the local surplus. I then went to target, bought a 30.00 lamp w/ the 5 adjustable gooseneck heads. I unscrewed 2 of the heads from the base. Then I drilled a hole in my two .50 cal cans and threaded the heads onto it. After that, I installed a little DIY touch lamp device that uses the metal on head & can as a switch. Then I added a long cord and plug on the end.

    Then I stuck the touch lamp piece in the remaining floor lamp w/ 3 heads left. Now I have 3 lamps in my living room, all w/ the same head, all are touch operated (3 dimming settings). It came out unbelievably nice for a total of about 70 bucks for all parts. I will post an instructable in the next week or so.

  5. And if you stuck in regular boring switches, the cost drops a lot. The touch lamp devices were about 8-10 bucks each. A boring in-line switch on the cord is prob a buck or two. A real switch installed on the can would be 3-4 bucks. I did it my way to keep the surface of the cans pristine and ammo-y.

  6. “The .50 caliber cans normally cost around $6 and the .30 cal cost around $5.”

    They have .30 and .50 cans for as low as $5.99.

  7. I found a 50 cal ammo box at a surplus store for 4 bucks… it’s pretty cool, I can take my lunch in it or make shit out of it, like the ipod amp featured in readymade!

  8. If you want a really strong box, ask for a detonator storage box. Huge thick steel, big locking lugs and a padlock hasp, plus two long metal handles.

  9. since they are under indictment for environmental crimes they may have to charge more for their items

  10. Dauphin County man charged in illegal dumping case.

    Attorney General Tom Corbett announced that agents from the Attorney General’s Environmental Crimes Section have filed criminal charges against the owner of a Dauphin County salvage business accused of illegal burning, burying and dumping waste chemicals, metals and other materials.

    The criminal charges state that Charles S. Coleman of Millersburg, owner of Coleman’s Surplus, illegally stored or disposed of solvents, lead, and cadmium on the property. Lead and cadmium are both classified as hazardous wastes.

    Coleman is also charged with illegally burying waste items on the property, including wood, metal, piping, empty 55 gallon drums, metal cylinders, machinery, utility poles, ashes and tires.

  11. DEP Daily Update

    Dauphin County Man Faces Charges in Illegal Dumping Operation

    HARRISBURG (May 5) — Agents from the Attorney General’s Environmental Crimes Section have filed criminal charges against the owner of a Dauphin County salvage business accused of illegal burning, burying and dumping waste chemicals, metals and other materials.

    Attorney General Tom Corbett identified the defendant as Charles S. Coleman, 61, of 360 Klinger Rd., Millersburg. Coleman is the owner of Coleman’s Surplus, located at the same address.

    The criminal charges state that Coleman illegally stored or disposed of solvents, lead, and cadmium on the property. Lead and cadmium are both classified as hazardous wastes.

    Corbett said Coleman also allegedly burned motors and wire on the property, in order to recover various metals.

    The charges state that Coleman also illegally buried waste items on the property, including wood, metal, piping, empty 55 gallon drums, metal cylinders, machinery, utility poles, ashes and tires.

    Corbett said that on Feb. 8, 2006, agents from the Attorney General’s Environmental Crimes Section, assisted by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), executed a search warrant at the Coleman property. During the course of that search, agents took samples from various drums stored on the property, as well as soil samples from an area where items were allegedly burned.

    According to the criminal charges, DEP analysis of the samples indicated the presence of lead and cadmium, along with the solvent 1,4 – dichlorobenzene.

    Corbett said that a review of records with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) determined that no permits had ever been issued to Coleman or any other individual to legally dump, burn or bury waste on the Millersburg property.

    According to the criminal charges, Coleman had previously been issued a DEP permit to process waste wood on the property. That permit, which expired in April 2000, specifically prohibited any waste wood or wood chips from being stored on the site for more that one year.

    Coleman is charged with three counts of unlawful management of hazardous waste. Each of those counts is a second degree felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine of $2,500 to $100,000.

    Additionally, Coleman is charged with four counts of unlawful conduct under Pennsylvania’s Solid Waste Management Act along with two counts of unlawful management of residual waste. Each of those counts is a third degree misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of $1,000 to $25,000.

    The criminal charged were filed May 4 before Elizabethville Magisterial District Judge Rebecca Jo Margerum. Coleman was released on his own recognizance and a preliminary hearing will be scheduled at a later date.

    The case will be prosecuted in Dauphin County by Chief Deputy Attorney General Glenn Parno, of the Attorney General’s Environmental Crimes Section.

    Corbett thanked the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection for their assistance with this investigation.

  12. I need help selling the actual infrared seeker heads for the sidewinders. This is ligit. I can list on ebay but thought this site was better to get an answer as to value etc… These were purchased in 1970’s from actual containers that were supposed to be empty but several had seeker heads with all the gold etc.. inside. After a court battle with the government, we won the case. Now my father in law wants to sell them. Any ideas as to a good surplus site to sell??? Thank you.

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