HOW TO – Make an anti-wallet

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The instructables wallet challenge has some great entries, I like this one that’s not really a wallet at all… Johnsuri writes –

toss the wallet. it’s day is over. this is a bona fide, fully functioning wallet replacement, not just a supercharged key chain.

some personality quirks nourish love, credit cards lost in harvard square, porter square, davis square and goverment center do not. in order to save a love strained by the constant reliance on the honesty of wage slave clerks, i needed a solution fast.

i thought if i attached her cards to her keys this would ensure that if she did leave them she would soon realize her mistake when she couldn’t get into the car or house.

i was even willing to throw money at the problem, however, all the store bought solutions either broke quickly or were too bulky.

i thought about a key ring, but the cards needed to be easily removed if she visited an atm or summoned by a police officer.

finally i came upon the straight gate carbiner–small enough to fit in your pocket and able to thread a 1/4″ punch hole.

Just a couple notes, we’ve had no problems with wear on the magnetic strips and as long as the cards are aligned the holes do not abrade keeping the cards intact.

instructables : the anti wallet – Link.

14 thoughts on “HOW TO – Make an anti-wallet

  1. At the risk of sounding paranoid, I just wanted to point out that if you’re going to do something like this you need to be extra careful not to lose the thing.

    We recently lost a key ring through a hole in my husband’s pocket, and it was never turned in to the mall lost and found. We had spares for all the keys, but I’m thankful that there was no identifying information on the ring. Having my keys does a potential evildoer no good if they can’t find out where I live.

    If you lose this type of setup, whoever finds it would have access to both your credit cards (many of which have fraud protection these days) and to your home and car (at least until you could get all of your locks changed). Most people wouldn’t take advantage of that, but it would spook me just the same.

  2. At the risk of sounding paranoid, I just wanted to point out that if you’re going to do something like this you need to be extra careful not to lose the thing.

    We recently lost a key ring through a hole in my husband’s pocket, and they were never turned them in to the mall lost and found. Thankfully we had spares for all the keys, but I’m thankful that there was no identifying information on the ring. Then whoever found them would have had total access not only to our fraud-protected credit cards but to our home and cars (at least until we could have gotten all of our locks changed).

  3. When my driver’s license expired, and I went to get a new one, the clerk punched a hole in my old license. Apparently that means it’s no longer valid, so that might be an issue to consider if you intend to punch holes in I.D. cards.

    Or maybe not, I’m not sure.

  4. I bet there is some way to have an clear plastic ID holder that you could spindle or mutilate without busting up the actual ID.

    and I too would be VERY worried to lose my keys AND my home address in one convenient house-breaking-car-breaking-credit-theft package.

    Otherwise, this is still a sweet idea!

  5. What I use is a credit card holder that has a slot in the leather for a removable money clip. That works pretty good. No solution for the key issue, though.

    One thing I did for the house – bought round flat magnets and nailed next to the door and the mail area. Then everyone who comes in – I have them put their keys there right away. More of a habit/routine thing..

  6. I really like the idea but be careful. We used to punch holes in our security batches to attach them to keychains etc. but if you punched them in the wrong spot it would destroy the wire loop used by the wireless reader and you have to explain to facilities why you destroyed a cheap looking but apparently very expensive piece of plastic.

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