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The T-shirt quilts keep on coming! This time from one of our own, CRAFT & MAKE’s Managing Editor, Shawn Connally.

Shawn writes:

Bruce has boxes and boxes of old tees that he always swore he would make a quilt out of someday. But he can’t even sew a button on! So I took matters into my own hands (well, a fabulous quiltmaker’s hands), and had one made for him a couple of years ago.

See more photos of the beautiful T-shirt quilt on Shawn’s flickr set here – Link.

4 thoughts on “More Fabulous T-Shirt Quilts

  1. This may be a redundant comment/question – I thought I had posted it earlier this weekend but don’t see it…
    This is one of the most wonderful t-shirt quilts I have seen. As a mother of a 17 year old headed to college soon I am determined to have his “t-shirt collection” travel with him! This is a great idea!
    Did you interface each t-shirt square? If yes, with what product? Did you do the quilting? If yes, how? If no, who then?
    Thanks so much for sharing this project!
    Laura Lee
    capital-sew-and-sew.blogspot.com/

  2. My sisters and I are in the process of making several t-shirt quilts. We put Pelon 906F interfacing on the back of each of the shirts we were going to use in the quilt. (Walmart had it for $1.66 a yard, but we got it at JoAnn Fabrics for $1.25 per yard with our trusty ½ off coupon.) The directions I had read, recommended using a pressing cloth to iron on the Pelon. Don’t bother. It works much quicker and stays on much better to iron directly on the interfacing itself. It gave a stability to the shirt and made cutting out the desired size and “framing” each with the quilting fabric much easier. We “framed” each t-shirt with cotton fabric to create a standard size to all the t-shirts since they all had designs of a different size. The quilting fabric also gave a cohesiveness look to the quilt.

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