Technology
Build a QRSS (extreme slow speed continuous wave) transmission detector

Hans2
This month’s Gadget Freak comes courtesy of investment banker Hans Summers. He built a simple receiver capable of detecting QRSS transmissions on a fixed frequency. The QRSS receiver is powered by a computer’s USB port and the audio output feeds into the PC’s sound card. Hans used a toroidal transformer as matching and input filter, connected directly to a 30m (10MHz) dipole antenna and a useful oscillator/mixer IC as a crystal oscillator and mixer. Link.

10 thoughts on “Build a QRSS (extreme slow speed continuous wave) transmission detector

  1. Very neat stuff.
    But one little thing does annoy me. Why, when a neat project has a lot of interesting technical images (the scope trace, the neat little mint box case etc.) do we get a picture of a guy making a goofy face (call it the Bre Pettis effect).

  2. monopole: Because there are other websites you can visit to focus on the gritty details. MAKE concentrates *at least* as much on having fun as they do on the actual technology.

  3. …get a picture of a guy making a goofy face (call it the Bre Pettis effect)…

    Nah. It’s the Gadget Freak effect. They always have these goofy stories and funny pictures. It’s part of their style.

Comments are closed.

Tagged

current: @adafruit - previous: MAKE, popular science, hackaday, engadget, fallon, braincraft ... howtoons, 2600...

View more articles by Phillip Torrone