Computers & Mobile

Amazing! Andreas Jakl posted a cool N95 hack that uses the built-in accelerometer, Python, Bluetooth, and a microcontroller to control the movement of a remote control car:

Now we wanted to take the acceleration sensor of a mobile phone to the next level and use it to control something literally “bigger” than an application that is running on the phone itself.

The result is called “ShakerRacer” (thanks to Adam Montandon for this great name!). Stephan Selinger, one of our professors, bought a normal RC car for about €90 and “tuned” it. Not in the traditional way, but instead he replaced the standard remote control component with an own microcontroller and a Bluetooth-module.

Using the Python module aXYZ from cyke64, it was possible to write a small application that translates the movements of the N95 acceleration sensor to commands that can be understood by the car. This enables you to go as fast as 30 km/h by just tilting your phone!

ShakerRacer: Real RC car controlled with the N95 acceleration sensor – [via] Link

6 thoughts on “RC car controlled with the N95 acceleration sensor

  1. I couldn’t find the source code to this project, so I hacked something together and posted it here. You’ll need to be running Python for S60 on your N95. I tested it with a Bluetooth module from SparkFun (see the source code for details), but you could use it to send serial data over Bluetooth to some other device as well.

  2. Great job on the source code!

    We will release the source code of ShakerRacer shortly, currently we are still tweaking it here and there. Instead of sending just the directions, we implemented it to allow a more analogous control.

    When dealing with an RC car, it also often switches to brake-mode instead of reversing if you go back too fast. Preventing this also requires some processing of the output in order to have the value stay at 0 for some time.

    Best regards,
    Andreas Jakl
    symbianresources.com

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I'm a tinkerer and finally reached the point where I fix more things than I break. When I'm not tinkering, I'm probably editing a book for Maker Media.

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