Computers & Mobile
iPhone audio recognition

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iPhone hacker extraordinaire Erica Sadun made an application for the iPhone that will listen to music and identify it! She writes –

Download a copy of the Listen beta. It’s still *very* beta. Install it on your iPhone, get near music and run it. It will sample the music for 5 seconds and then attempt to contact the id server. If it succeeds, great, you’ll see the song, artist and album. If it fails, nothing happens. You just wait 30 seconds and if you haven’t gotten an ID, quit and restart the program.

iPhone audio recognition [via] – Link.

10 thoughts on “iPhone audio recognition

  1. Cool! Wasn’t there something like this on the web (not specific to iPhone)? I heard about it on NPR once and I’ve been looking for it off’n’on ever since and never found it… or maybe it was supposed to recognize a song if you whistled a few bars…?

  2. There’s the shazam.com service that’s been running in the UK for a few years now; ring them on your mobile/cell phone, hold it up to the music you want to id, then (hopefully) you’ll get a txt back in a minute or two identifying the tune. Costs a call and 50p (I think…)

    Worked perfectly the couple of times I tried it.

  3. There’s the shazam.com service that’s been running in the UK for a few years now; ring them on your mobile/cell phone, hold it up to the music you want to id, then (hopefully) you’ll get a txt back in a minute or two identifying the tune. Costs a call and 50p (I think…)

    Worked perfectly the couple of times I tried it.

  4. verizon wireless has a free program that works on a bunch of their phones (i have the vx9900) that id’s a tune with 10 seconds of sampling. i’ve done it successfully in a room full of talking people, and on very fuzzy radio stations.

  5. Some mobile phones already have this function – I have it on my sony ericsson mobile (w710i). I’ve tried it before, and it works quite well – even identifying non-english songs.

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