Technology
Have you seen this plug?

Unknown Connector
From the MAKE Flickr photo pool

If you or anyone you know have information leading to the identification of this connector, please contact Flickr user dnny (or just leave a comment here) –

Do you know what connector this is? Please inform me. On the box that it was found, it said “Tuchel” but that was not the original box and can be miss leading…
I have seen simillar connectors in some old audio devices.

Unknown Connector on Flickr

18 thoughts on “Have you seen this plug?

  1. I was doing some searching and it looks like Tuchel may refer to the company Amphenol-Tuchel Electronics GmbH ( http://www.amphenol.de/en/about/amphenol.shtml ). They appear to be a manufacturer of, strangely enough, electronics connectors. I am guessing Tuchel was the German companies name before being bought by or merging with Amphenol, a US company. I would contact the German division above, as they may have some way to help you identify it.

  2. Can’t tell but it looks 1950’s, with the Bakelite. The sharp edges don’t look very child friendly. The amount of exposed metal leads one to believe it is for a fairly high amperage or wattage use like some kind of countertop cooking appliance or something.

  3. Tuchels are commonly used on pro-video and film camera headsets. These older style connectors are also common in older multi-channel audio equipment, and used with active probes. Their shape makes for easy insertion, a welcome change from common multi-contact connectors in the 1950’s. They’re still used today.

  4. Thanks for all. I got few replys to my flickr here they are:

    Matthew Sylvester says:

    They are made by Tuchel, and they were used to connect headsets to old broadcast TV cameras, particularly in the UK. I think you could get them with the blades at different angles to prevent incompatible equipment being connected.

    http://www.canford.co.uk/Products/43-302.aspx

    Hope that helps!

    ok1mab says:

    This is proprietary connector used in amplifiers produced by Czechoslovak company Tesla in 70’s and 80’s , usually for connecting speakers. (One wing was ground, one 4Ohm output, one 8, one 16 and one 100V) Current functional equivalent is Speakon connector (but with less contacts).
    Another use was in crossconnecting panels in recording studios.

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