607937 5Wco

So, I have to give kuddos to Global Industries for doing the best job I’ve ever seen publishing information about a workbench. If you’re a maker that ships things for a living, this is a nice bench. Global isn’t an advertiser or anything like, they just did a great job with showing exactly what they’re selling.

Heavy Duty Packaging Workbench with Square Edge Plastic Top… This packaging workbench has a 1-5/8″ thick plastic top with a square edge supported by heavy-duty 2″ square 14 gauge steel tubular legs that adjust from 28-34″H at 2″ increments and are tested to 5,000 lb. capacity. The super-strong, easy-to-clean bench top is made of high pressure plastic laminate-faced wood-core takes heavy abuse. It provides a smooth, tough working surface for many applications. Includes adjustable leveling floor glides and leveling foot plates that allow floor anchoring. Customize your packaging workbench by adding the packaging riser, lower packaging shelf, standard lower shelf or the stackable drawers.

20 thoughts on “60 X 30 packaging bench

  1. Be warned, at my job we have used (and continue to use) Global Industries for things like furniture due to their low prices a decent quality of final product. However, as with anything, our experience suggests you get what you pay for. We have had numerous problem with their quality controls in the form of missing parts for furniture and large products being damaged in shipping because of poor packing. It can, sometimes, take numerous return attempts to correct the issue and communication can, sometimes, be a problem.

    This is not to say you shouldn’t buy from them. They certainly have some of the best prices around (as far as we’ve seen) and their products are pretty decent when you have all the parts and they’re put together. I know those are, usually, the most important thing when you’re a hobbiest. I just want to make sure you know that you might have to deal with some extra headaches when getting that good deal.

  2. This is probably the worst post I’ve ever seen on this site. Who cares if they did a great job showing the product? The product is neither exciting nor innovative.

  3. Besides apologizing for the, numerous, spelling errors in the last post (I got lazy and forgot to drop it into Word for spell-check), I just want to go on record as saying that the comments expressed in my previous post are my personal experience dealing with Global Industries and do not represent the opinions of my employer (who will remain nameless).

  4. @Phillip – Hopefully so. Personally, I see it as part of the nature of the beast. My understanding is that they are working directly with the factories overseas and, in many cases, they don’t speak English over there. This is, probably, what leads to a lot of the communication issues. Also, any time you try to produce a product at the lowest price possible you end up cutting corners. In the case of Global Industries, I can safely say that the one place they don’t seem to cut corners on is build quality which, as I said, I would assume to be the most important thing for Makers.

  5. @Tom – Sometimes I agree that a post may be out of left field for a certain blog’s topic, but in this case I think this is very topical. Most makers need to find quality tools, work furniture, and materials at the lowest price possible and, very often, the sites that provide this have horrible descriptions/images of the stuff they’re selling. This makes it hard to tell what you’re ordering until it actually arrives. Of course, those same types of sites also tend to be the worst when it comes to returning products, which compounds the issue.

    A site that provides thorough descriptions and diagrams for the products they’re selling is a godsend for makers. The only thing better is sites that include general reference information about the product being listed such as McMaster-Carr (www.mcmaster.com) and Omega Engineering (www.omega.com, who don’t put the info on their site but are famous for sending out free, hard cover, sets of manuals on such topics as temperature measurement, pressure measurement, data acquisition, etc. I have an older set sitting in the cube with me right now and they’re great references if you can get them to send it to you.). Those examples aren’t, necessarily, the cheapest sources for stuff but they suit the point I’m trying to make. Companies that go the extra mile to provide useful/descriptive info on their sites should be recognized for it and makers should work to spread the name of such sites around to their fellows.

  6. @Tom – everyone seems to like the post, we *do* cover tools and also comment on how site publish important information for makers.

    i’m impressed that this is the “worst post” on the site, if that’s true, i’m ok with that :)

  7. @ Phillip: It’s a pleasant advertorial, I can imagine far worse ones, but I’d rather have none at all.

    I understand Make needs to make money, but I thought it supported itself as well as it could with the actual Magazine and the Maker Shed Store, not to mention the scraps you get from big daddy O’Reilly.

    Most other ads have little enough to do with DIY and the Make spirit as it is, but advertorials like this are stretching it. I’ve spotted some others here in the past, but let it slide, thinking it was a one-time occurance, or a way to profile the Make blog as a nice place for advertisement, to attrackt more relevant ads. And I have seen these relevant ads, but they should replace trite like this, not co-exist.

    As I said, I’ve let it slide in the past, and I sincerely hope you make all the money you can while doing a great thing like Make magazine. However, I feel I should speak up now, especially after patronizing poor Tom, who I suspect shares much of my opinion.

  8. @jeff –

    i hope it was clear in the post, but i’ll say it again..

    *Global isn’t an advertiser or anything like, they just did a great job with showing exactly what they’re selling.*

    if someone is an advertiser on MAKE, i’d say it – we don’t do “advertorial”.

    what “other ones” have you spotted?

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