Craft & Design
Milk crate sphere

cratesper.jpg

The folks who make the “cratemen” around Melbourne were invited to make a float for the Adelaide Fringe Festival, and here’s what they came up with. From their account:

We were reluctant however to simply relocate our street based work into a radically different arena. Instead we were interested in the idea of a parade as being a cross between performance art, sculpture, and audience participation.

The crate sphere was designed to be rolled down the street as the final act in the parade. Comprising of 688 milk crates and being over 4.5 meters high, it had an estimated weight of over 700 kilograms. It was hoped that upon seeing us struggle with the beast, members of the audience would join in, and help us roll the sphere to a glorious end!

Unfortunately the reality was somewhat different.

People in their curiosity came closer and closer to the ball – but were reluctant to get involved and help, or move out of its way when it threatened to crush them. Our cries of distress were misinterpreted as part of the ‘theatre’ of the situation, as we struggled to maintain control. After completing about a quarter of the parade route, the organizers and the police decided to pull the plug, and ordered us to stop the ball.

It was rolled to the side of the street, and left to sit in a ‘no parking’ zone. Here it sat for a day or so, puzzling passers by, a strange visitor to the quaint streets of Adelaide.”

What do you think they used to attach the crates to one another? Zip ties? Via Wooster Collective.

4 thoughts on “Milk crate sphere

  1. That was the first thing I thought!:

    “Jesus, that could crush you!”

    and when I saw the weight…great idea though.

  2. “or move out of its way when it threatened to crush them. ”

    After having played Katamari Damacy, I must admit I probably would have done the same as the crowd.

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Becky Stern is a Content Creator at Autodesk/Instructables, and part time faculty at New York’s School of Visual Arts Products of Design grad program. Making and sharing are her two biggest passions, and she's created hundreds of free online DIY tutorials and videos, mostly about technology and its intersection with crafts. Find her @bekathwia on YouTube/Twitter/Instagram.

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