Technology
Wire Glue, now made with Buckyballs!
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ThinkGeek is now selling “Wire Glue,” a conductive adhesive made with micro-carbons. They’re selling a .3 oz bottle for $4. I like what BotJunkie said about it:

It looks like a neat product, and I’m sure it works well, but if you’re thinking of getting this rather than learning how to solder… You should just learn how to solder. It’s cheap, it’s fun, and you get to melt metal and make stuff. Give it a shot, and then after you burn yourself, you can go ahead and buy the glue without feeling guilty.

“Wire Glue” Conductive Glue

32 thoughts on “Wire Glue, now made with Buckyballs!

  1. Interesting new product, but where’s the current limiting diode in this circuit? That LED won’t last as long without one.

  2. Now, I don’t mind soldering, so don’t get me wrong, as far as this product is concernced I have to say – it’s about time.

  3. there are times and places where soldering isn’t an option, and this could be a great solution for them. it’s not going to replace soldering, but a ball peen hammer doesn’t replace a framing hammer either. right tool for right job.

      1. No wire wrapping is not a lost art.

        The control system for our power station has all the field devices wire wrapped at the back of the programmable logic controller. THere is thounds and thousands of them.

        google Siemens T3000 control system.

        We use an automatic wire wrap gun to give a reliable connection

  4. I’ve had this exact wire glue for almost 2 years now and its not that great. I used it for surface mounting some luxeon rebel led’s. It’s not that strong of a bond and the resistance is relatively high (0.5-5 ohms) even for small connections

  5. Is this stuff really made with buckyballs? The ThinkGeek site doesn’t say that. They mention that they like buckyballs, and they say that the glue is made with “microcarbon technology”, but they don’t say that the glue is made from fullerenes. It’s probably just graphite.

  6. I doubt it’s actually using fullerenes. I was just trying to emulate breathless ad copy in the headline.

    All I can find online is that it uses microcabon technology. I bet you’re right. It’s probably just a base of graphite. I also wonder how strong it is and how conductive.

  7. This stuff ain’t great. You have to mix it all the time to get a useful consistency, and it dries very brittle. The connections are far more fragile than a solder joint. I’ve used it to make connections to (heat sensitive) flex circuits, with a drop of epoxy over the top for strain relief. Works, but probably best to use conductive epoxy in the first place!

  8. It doesnt need a resistor because apparently all of this stuff has very high resistance. Ive been looking into this and other stuff to make smd possible without a toaster oven etc. Even just to make shields for smd ic’s butit looks like the resistance is way too high. S*cks because i really want to do smd (getting hard to even buy nonsmd) but what a long, giant PITA process! And if you screw up.. start all over again *sigh*

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Gareth Branwyn is a freelance writer and the former Editorial Director of Maker Media. He is the author or editor of over a dozen books on technology, DIY, and geek culture. He is currently a contributor to Boing Boing, Wink Books, and Wink Fun. And he has a new best-of writing collection and “lazy man’s memoir,” called Borg Like Me.

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