Craft & Design Paper Crafts

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Instructables user BuildMakeCraftBake has a how-to up on this interesting technique for transferring plant pigments to paper by hammering them. She writes:

The vibrant colors of leaves and flowers are easy to preserve by pounding them to release their natural dyes onto paper. I learned this fun and simple technique from my college roommate, Sarah, but it’s been around a lot longer — I hear that Cherokee women pounded flowers to decorate fabric. With not much more than a hammer and some leaves, you can make beautiful botanical cards or prints and enjoy spring greenery year-round. Who knew that venting your frustrations could have such aesthetically pleasing results?

4 thoughts on “How-To: Hammered Leaf and Flower Prints

  1. As soon as I read this I knew I had to try it.
    I want to use this technique to dye fabrics, so I have been testing a variety of flowers and foliage from my yard on a piece of white muslin. I have found that weeds work better than cultivated plants, generally. I have also found that a rubber mallet works better than a regular hammer. It allows for more detail. Now that I have a few favorites I just have to test to see which ones will hold up through laundering.
    Thanks again for a great idea!

  2. I know from when I was a kid that geranium blossoms have a vibrant, colorful juice in them that can be smushed into fabric.

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Becky Stern is a Content Creator at Autodesk/Instructables, and part time faculty at New York’s School of Visual Arts Products of Design grad program. Making and sharing are her two biggest passions, and she's created hundreds of free online DIY tutorials and videos, mostly about technology and its intersection with crafts. Find her @bekathwia on YouTube/Twitter/Instagram.

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