How-To: Upside-Down Hanging Planters

Gardening

waterwickingtomaters.jpg

Instructables user velvel shows us how to make these inverted tomato planters with a water-wicking system for balcony gardening.

4 thoughts on “How-To: Upside-Down Hanging Planters

  1. Lori says:

    I read an article recently that said the tomato plants don’t produce very well in this position. How productive have your plants been upside-down?
    Thanks,
    Lori

  2. velvel says:

    This is the first year I’m growing with this exact system. Last year my setup was the same except for the wicks and I did very well. This year I expect to do better because I think the wicks are a vast improvement over last year’s drip system.
    I don’t think upside-down has much of an effect on yield, but I wouldn’t know for sure. I haven’t tried it right-side-up. I bet the biggest factor is pot size. Naturally, anything you hang is going to be fairly small. Pot size would limit the plant size and also how much water you can have available to the plant.
    Also, I think hanging up the plants without any kind of watering system will make it a HUGE pain in the butt to water. Not only do you have to schlep the water to the containers, but you also have to lift the water over the top. If you hang the containers with any room for the plants to grow, you’ll be lifting your watering can over your head every time. The pain in the butt can probably make some people hesitant to keep up on the watering. And as the plants grow, they get VERY thirsty.
    As long as you can keep water available to the plant and the container isn’t too small, I think you can do pretty well.

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Becky Stern is a Content Creator at Autodesk/Instructables, and part time faculty at New York’s School of Visual Arts Products of Design grad program. Making and sharing are her two biggest passions, and she's created hundreds of free online DIY tutorials and videos, mostly about technology and its intersection with crafts. Find her @bekathwia on YouTube/Twitter/Instagram.

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