Craft & Design
Keyring/facepalm
Split_Ring_Key.jpg

Scott Amron of Amron Experimental wins this decade’s OMG-why-didn’t-I-think-of-that award. Via Neatorama.

18 thoughts on “Keyring/facepalm

  1. The first time you have to insert and turn that key with slippery hands, you’ll realize you can’t get the same kind of grip on a ring as you can on a flat key head.

  2. Split rings are made of steel so that they are springy, keys are made of brass so they are easy to cut. If made from brass, the split ring would quickly open up and loose it’s spring, and if made from steel the key would be difficult to duplicate.

  3. In addition, with either a set of similar keys OR a set of normal keys attached, this would not lay comfortably in a pants pocket.

  4. If the key is part of the ring, I don’t see how you get other keys on the ring as they won’t be able to slide alll the way around.

  5. How is it even built? The split ring must be thin in order to be flexible. The key needs to be rigid in order to work.

    It’s such a nonsensical design that I’m not convinced that the posted picture is of an actual prototype, but rather a photoshopped image.

  6. “How is it even built? The split ring must be thin in order to be flexible. The key needs to be rigid in order to work”

    Could be brazed.

  7. I have to agree with most of the previous posters in that this is an amazingly IMPRACTICAL design. I’m glad I did not think of this.

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I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I am a long-time contributor to MAKE magazine and makezine.com. My work has also appeared in ReadyMade, c't – Magazin für Computertechnik, and The Wall Street Journal.

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