I’m in the Detroit area this week, exploring plans for a Maker Faire here next summer. I’ve been spending most of the time at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, a treasure-trove of American making.

On Saturday, I’ll be stopping by the new hacker/maker space called I3 Detroit in Royal Oaks, MI. I’ll be there from around 11 am to 1pm (give or take a half-hour). If you are a maker in the area, and don’t mind giving up some time that you might otherwise spend on your favorite project, please drop by I3 Detroit and share your thoughts on doing a Maker Faire in the Detroit area. I am always looking to discover new makers and learn more about cool projects — at home, in schools, or even at work. I am also proud to talk about our new “kids of all ages” issue.

I3 Detroit is located at 322 East Fourth Street, Royal Oaks, MI.

4 thoughts on “Meeting makers in Detroit this Saturday

  1. I’m 5 hours by car plus a 3 mile bike ride and 5 miles by boat. Bring a Maker Faire to Michigan and my family will be there!

  2. I’m sure your readers will figure it out, but it is Royal Oak, not Royal Oaks. Wish I was still in Motown for this one!! Have a blast!

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DALE DOUGHERTY is the leading advocate of the Maker Movement. He founded Make: Magazine 2005, which first used the term “makers” to describe people who enjoyed “hands-on” work and play. He started Maker Faire in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006, and this event has spread to nearly 200 locations in 40 countries, with over 1.5M attendees annually. He is President of Make:Community, which produces Make: and Maker Faire.

In 2011 Dougherty was honored at the White House as a “Champion of Change” through an initiative that honors Americans who are “doing extraordinary things in their communities to out-innovate, out-educate and out-build the rest of the world.” At the 2014 White House Maker Faire he was introduced by President Obama as an American innovator making significant contributions to the fields of education and business. He believes that the Maker Movement has the potential to transform the educational experience of students and introduce them to the practice of innovation through play and tinkering.

Dougherty is the author of “Free to Make: How the Maker Movement Is Changing our Jobs, Schools and Minds” with Adriane Conrad. He is co-author of "Maker City: A Practical Guide for Reinventing American Cities" with Peter Hirshberg and Marcia Kadanoff.

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