Craft & Design Science
Blu-Ray Star Trek laser pops balloons across a room

phaser-12X-cone-7.jpg

MAKE rockstar Kipkay first put a Blu-Ray laser diode into a Star Trek phaser toy back in 2007. Hack N Mod’s Jay has added an illuminated safety switch, a large heat sink, and a custom focusing adapter at the tip. The laser operates at 320 mA and gives 465 mW of power, and is, to be fair, quite dangerous for the eyes. Definitely not a toy. Even though it’s, um, built into one. [via DVICE]

18 thoughts on “Blu-Ray Star Trek laser pops balloons across a room

  1. Seriously, you are pointing a fricken laser beam at a chrome tap, crystal glasses, I don’t know how many reflective surfaces…

    The laser has enough power to pop a balloon, what do you think it is going to do to your eyes.

    How much insurance does Make magazine carry anyway?

  2. would you weld without a shield?
    wire a 220 socket with the power on?
    use a table saw without a blade guard?
    run a drill press with your eyes closed?
    smoke while making your own dynamite?

    Not really bothered with the device itself, just the lackadaisical approach to safety.

    I vote for an issue of make all focused on safety in the “lab” (where lab is the workshop, the kitchen, and everywhere else we’re doing experiments.)

    1. His writeup says: Proper eye protection for 405nm wave length is recommended. And extreme caution needed when using. I would recommend storing it in a lockable case so that it cannot be accessed by just any person or child…

      Eye Protection: (405nm)
      http://store.oemlasersystems.com/ind…91239ce0cbfdb4

      Stop complaining and enjoy…

    2. >would you weld without a shield?
      Yes, well to tack anyway

      >wire a 220 socket with the power on?
      Yep.

      >use a table saw without a blade guard?
      Hell yeah.

      >run a drill press with your eyes closed?
      No prob, once I’d done the setup.

      >smoke while making your own dynamite?
      Dynamite yeah, gunpowder no.

      >Not really bothered with the device itself, just the >lackadaisical approach to safety.

      This thing scares the crap out of me. If it were in my house I would treat it just like a handgun.

      >I vote for an issue of make all focused on safety in the >”lab” (where lab is the workshop, the kitchen, and >everywhere else we’re doing experiments.)

      Usually I’m a “safety third” kind of guy, but building something genuinely dangerous into a toy gun is a bad, bad idea.

        1. Jake, am counting down to the steampunk ray-gun version now!

          Sort of related but if you use one of those really high power LEDs they used for lighting these days and focus the light with a lens does that give you enough power to burn things. Obviously only at the focal point (like a magnifying glass and ants) but that could be useful for various things.

  3. Well, yes, I do weld without a shield all the time, what I call ‘blink-welding’. And the guard on my table saw is more dangerous if it’s on.
    History has shown us that if you have the intelligence and disipline to make such a weapon, you generally have learmed the responsibility that comes with it. It’s when you toss handguns into a monkey cage when all heck breaks loose.

    1. Oh damn! I totally want to toss handguns into a monkey cage now! :P

      Honestly, it’s the building it into a toy that gets to me. I can respect guns as tools but I have a visceral reaction to toy guns of all sorts.

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I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I am a long-time contributor to MAKE magazine and makezine.com. My work has also appeared in ReadyMade, c't – Magazin für Computertechnik, and The Wall Street Journal.

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