3D Printing & Imaging
MAKE On Detroit Area Newsstand

Here’s the new issue of MAKE on the newsstand at Barnes and Noble in Dearborn, MI. It’s always a delight for me to find it and see MAKE next to other magazines. MAKE is like a little brother who somehow gets attention by being a bit different. At this newsstand, the computers and business categories run into each other. We’re in standing out in a row with MaximumPC, Consumer Reports, Business Week and Wired.

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Also, Wired’s new issue, “The Next Industrial Revolution,” pairs nicely with MAKE’s “Desktop Factory” issue.

Is there a consensus emerging that we’re entering into a new era of manufacturing? The big idea is that complex tools for making things are becoming available to more people, just as desktop printing gave consumers capabilities that were available previously to professionals with typesetting and printing equipment. The learning curve required to operate this equipment and interface it to computers is making it possible for more people to get involved. So, in lots of areas but especially in manufacturing, professional-grade tools are coming within reach of hobbyists and small businesses. The future is open to anyone who wants to make something and even start a business.

Let a thousand factories bloom! And I write this from Detroit, which will be looking in this direction for its future.

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DALE DOUGHERTY is the leading advocate of the Maker Movement. He founded Make: Magazine 2005, which first used the term “makers” to describe people who enjoyed “hands-on” work and play. He started Maker Faire in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006, and this event has spread to nearly 200 locations in 40 countries, with over 1.5M attendees annually. He is President of Make:Community, which produces Make: and Maker Faire.

In 2011 Dougherty was honored at the White House as a “Champion of Change” through an initiative that honors Americans who are “doing extraordinary things in their communities to out-innovate, out-educate and out-build the rest of the world.” At the 2014 White House Maker Faire he was introduced by President Obama as an American innovator making significant contributions to the fields of education and business. He believes that the Maker Movement has the potential to transform the educational experience of students and introduce them to the practice of innovation through play and tinkering.

Dougherty is the author of “Free to Make: How the Maker Movement Is Changing our Jobs, Schools and Minds” with Adriane Conrad. He is co-author of "Maker City: A Practical Guide for Reinventing American Cities" with Peter Hirshberg and Marcia Kadanoff.

View more articles by Dale Dougherty