DumpsterWorld – “social network” for dumpster diving

Pt 1059

DumpsterWorld “social network” for dumpster diving… BtB.

D.D.F.A.Q.

Q: I don’t understand why people want to take things from the trash. You must not be homeless, because you own computers. Why do you dumpster dive?

Most people don’t understand how many useful resources are thrown in the garbage every day. Dumpster diving provides us with all kinds of free goods. Not only do we have homes and computers, some of us have homes full of stuff like COMPUTERS FROM DUMPSTERS. I bet you would take a free computer, if you had the chance. We don’t dumpster dive because we’re desperate, but because it’s a smart choice. Some of our reasons include:

  • Saving and making more money
  • Having more freedom by being less dependent on money
  • Helping other people by sharing what we find
  • Reducing waste to help the environment
  • Because treasure hunting is fun.

10 thoughts on “DumpsterWorld – “social network” for dumpster diving

  1. Dumpster diving is not advisable in residential areas because trash containers often contain cat litter, baby diapers, etc. However, it’s common in Philly for someone to leave an unwanted item in good condition on the curb a few days before trash pick-up for anyone to pick up. Lotsa goodies, especially furniture, that way!

  2. I found that site a couple of week ago and it was pretty interesting reading about the finds. But some of the members talk about taking food. Sure it is still in its package, but some people were taking milk, produce etc. I mean some crackers or canned food maybe, but be sensible.

    I live on a pretty busy road. If i dont want something i just walk it to the edge of the property and stick a free sign on it. Gone within hours.

    1. Reading the whole “dumpster diving for food” thing completely put me off of that entire board, and I departed post-haste.

      I tried to start a “Freecycle for Makers” set of localized communities using Google Groups, but I’ve been having a very difficult time promoting it in a way that doesn’t seem pushy. Maybe some folks around here would be interested?

      http://makerlists.org

      Thanks!

    2. Eh, I’ve been dumpster diving at markets and bakeries as my primary source of food, combined with gardening and urban foraging for a few years now. Never gotten sick once. Produce is usually fine, and often times not in noticeably worse condition than it is in the stores sometimes. You have to be smart, of course, and wash things and don’t eat anything obviously rotten, but that’s really a pretty general food rule.

      Milk seems like a terrible idea, though yogurt is designed to last quite a while.

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