Fun & Games Science
The Yoshimoto Cube
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This is a pretty amazing folding transformation of a single-color 2-unit cube into a pair of stellated rhombic dodecahedra of different colors. Among its other interesting properties, the Yoshimoto Cube can actually be folded into a cube having the color of either star. You can buy the (fairly pricey) toy version pictured above from the Museum of Modern Art Store. It is also possible to make your own, from paper, by following the instructions in the video below. It is, reportedly, a very rewarding, if time-consuming, process. You can download the pattern here.

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4 thoughts on “The Yoshimoto Cube

  1. This was one of the only toys I ever wore out….

    It’s very relaxing to just flip the cube through it’s various configurations, and the fact that it could be pulled apart into TWO – it was one of the neatest doo-dads I remember having 25+ years ago.

    I’d love to find another one, but $65 in the MoMA store is a bit steep.

  2. We did a lot with this on Math Munch, including designing a one-sheet model called the Mega-Monster Mesh. You can print the model here:
    http://wp.me/p1WoPj-mY

    We also created a pair of stop motion animations inspired by the Yoshimoto Cube, which you can see in that same link, down at the bottom.

  3. What I have never xem độ bóng đá hôm nay understood is the insistence that they either have their own tournament or compete in qualification rounds. Why not both? Take the bottom 8/16/32 teams and every couple tỉ lệ cá cược of years host a tournament somewhere for them. The ‘Sh*t but loving it’ World Cup. They get to play teams at their level, score a few,tip free 5 sao win a few. Who knows, maybe it will improve some of the teams sufficiently so that they can actually have an impact in the qualification games rather than being whipping boys.
    I’d watch it.
    Kev (As a terrible footballer, I have an affinity with them)

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I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I am a long-time contributor to MAKE magazine and makezine.com. My work has also appeared in ReadyMade, c't – Magazin für Computertechnik, and The Wall Street Journal.

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