Homebrew 250-watt laser cutter
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Owen sent a link to his very sweet CNC laser that can cut sheet metal. He’s spent over two years and $15K developing the system.

This is a CO2 laser system that cuts sheet metal. The laser and all optics are stationary. The beam is directed downwards on to the part that sits on a computer controlled platform which moves the piece in the x and y directions. Cutting is achived by passing the beam through a focusing lens inside of a cutting head nozzle. Oxygen is fed into the side of the chamber below the focusing lens. This gas exits the nozzle along with the beam and the laser beam/oxygen combination serves to vaporize the steel.

4 thoughts on “Homebrew 250-watt laser cutter

  1. A 250 watt laser, fired at a highly reflective steel like target, from a height of around an inch, without any protective screening at all.

    What is it going to take to get the message across?

    Do we have to have makers blinded or their family members, before people finally learn?

    Plus that is before you even add in the dangers for house fires caused by stray laser reflections. Does someone have to die in a house fire before makers get the message?. A 250 watt laser is seriously dangerous. By all means use them but use them safely and responsibly and step one is cover them up!

    1. The idea of “stray” laser reflections is quite silly. The optics chain going from the laser head to the focusing lens is completely contained. Once the beam hits a focusing lens (also inside the cutting head) the beam focuses down to a specific point which is located 2mm from the port coming out of the cutting head. The divergence of the beam is such that even 4 inches away from the cutting port you cant even burn a piece of paper. You also can hardly even feel heat.

      C02 lasers are unlike a laser pointer, or a light saber, the amount of stray infrared light you are exposed to is less than bic lighter.

      I encourage you to do some research before posting.

      owen

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My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net

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