Workshop
Mark’s sweet workshop
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I just love Mark’s awe-inspiring maker lair.

The most fun part of the space is how the computer has its monitor on an extending swing-arm so that it can be positioned where it will do the most good- programming microcontrollers over by the electronics bench or swung near the CNC machine that I am working on to build stuff!

Every mad scientist needs a secret underground lab, and since I have a Ph.D. in molecular biology, I figured that I need one, too!

Do you have a cool workshop/workbench? Send me a link!

(More pix after the break)

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16 thoughts on “Mark’s sweet workshop

  1. Is that a stack of Heathkit trainer powered breadboards nestled in the shelves under the stairs? I raced through the old Heathkit electronics training course in high school in the 70’s, and those blue angular cases with the breadboard and power supply knobs seems pretty distinctive. Fond memories, of the course, the school, and Heathkits in general.

    1. They were a gift (along with all the original components and training manuals) from a neighbor. I learned electronics on them back in the day, and still use them as wonderful solderless breadboards to this day. I will note that my favorite by far is the microcomputer trainer, which – much in the style of the old KIM-1, has a hex display and a keypad, and makes for some of the most fun monitor-level programming ever…

      With all the great kits comping out these days, I almost feel like we are getting back to what was so great about Heath then.

    1. The minilathe (a 7×10 model) is the standard one from Harbor Freight. http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html I got it when they were on sale for a song a few months ago, and I have loved it – already made some very nice robotics wheel couplers and some parts for a DIY CNC machine, too… Thanks to the efforts of our local harckerspace, we even have classes on how to properly use a lathe from our resident design engineer.

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My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net

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