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New in the Maker Shed: Beginners lock-picking blend set by TOOOL

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Discover the inner workings of a mortise and cylinder lock, first developed by the Egyptians over 4000 years ago, with the Beginners Lock-Picking Blend set by TOOOL (The Open Organization Of Lock-pickers). Each set contains 8 handpicked tools that will get you on your way to opening a variety of different locks. Already have a lock pick set? Check out the credit card sized TOOOL Emergency Lock-Pick Card.

14 thoughts on “New in the Maker Shed: Beginners lock-picking blend set by TOOOL

  1. Why are these so freaking expensive? You can buy an Arduino for $30 but some bent pieces of metal with vastly fewer uses costs $40? Seems disproportionate to me.

  2. @ the two above:

    You can buy a $100 car and it is a car, or you can buy a $100,000 car – and it is a car. Both may get you to where you want to get, but the $100 spend just might let you down. Of course, the $100,000 spend might be overkill, since you have yet to learn to drive…

    So, what the lovely guys at TOOOL USA have done is to go out and find a set of really good picks and sell them on to you at a reasonable cost, so you don’t have to buy set after set of rubbish, or drop big money on something no better.

    Also, if you really want to make your own, I and others have published plans. If you are capable, they will be far better than these picks, as well as better than most that are available, perhaps even the ‘$100,000’ variations.

    I personally use handmade picks made by a craftsman in the USA, and I import them specially. Best in the world, at just $60 a pair. Cheap at twice the price.

  3. In reply to the excellent questions by Matt and Gear Head as to why the set is priced higher…

    We at TOOOL have hand-selected this set of picks from a variety of vendors to offer you tools we feel are more appropriate for locksport than those you might find on Amazon.com. Many common sets include key extractors, duplicate lockpicks, and other “tools” which offer little or no use (such as the extra long hook which doesn’t fit into any locks).

    PLUS! We found these lockpicks to be much more durable so they’ll last longer as you build up your own sets once you get into locksport. ;)

    At the end of the day we at TOOOL hope anyone who picks these up notices the differences from other sets, to see that this translates into a much more enjoyable experience.

    Also, please don’t forget that a portion of every sale goes directly to TOOOL, supporting our ability to teach people around the world the love of locksport, and providing supplies for locksport tournaments, competitions and workshops.

    If you have any questions or comments don’t hesitate to email us at sales@toool.us or visit our website (www.toool.us) which has a lot of lockpicking goodies.

    Cheers,

    -EricM
    Board of Directors – TOOOL.us

  4. I thought selling lock picks was illegal (to non-locksmiths). I did a google search and found that even in some states (NC), it can be considered a felony just to have possession of a lockpick. Just curious on the laws, maybe someone who knows more than me (and my google search) can advise?
    Thanks

    (fyi – ebay also has a policy on not selling lockpicks).

  5. Good tools are worth the price! Not that I know if these are or not personally :)

    I’ve tried making lock pics in the past from old band saw blades rescued from the bin at the local school where I used to do a night class. That made nice tools. Was never that good at using them though.

    I also post on a car restoring forum and people there are always complaining about the poor quality of the reproduction parts available these days. The quality is bad but they are cheap and people only seem to be interested in paying for cheap!

    Personally when I’ve spent 6+ years restoring a car I want to know what I am putting into it is good so it’s definitely worth paying more for quality. I’ve found the same to be true of tools.

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