Technology
Heat shrink fuse holder
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I love this clever fuse holder that a reader sent in. All it takes is some heat shrink tubing, a couple of small springs, and wire.

10 thoughts on “Heat shrink fuse holder

    1. There would be more point of contact with just the stripped wire held tight against the side of the barrel with the shrink tube, than the sprng at the end. PLUS, how do you tell if the fuse is bad? You can’t see it. Many circuits the fuse must be out of the circuit to do a continuity test.
      You ever make a ‘poor man’s fuse’? A segment of stranded wire and you leave ONE strand. Surely it must be in the field manual next to sticky bomb.

      1. I’ve seen the poor man’s fuse used in cordless phone batteries all the time. They usually put a section of unshrunk heat shrink around the tabs the strand of wire is soldered to though.

    2. I’ll bet they were worried about transferring heat to the fuse element, which might destroy it.

      I’ve never tried it so I don’t know how much of a danger that is.

    3. For the following method, you would need to use a terminal crimping tool, but these don’t cost much, and IMHO are a basic tool every householder or auto-owner should already have. Besides an auto-type blade fuse and wire ends, there are only 2 parts to add: what are called ‘crimp terminal connector with shrouded receptacle.’ Google the term, they are for sale at most US auto parts and hardware stores, as are the fuses. The connectors must match the wire size. Crimp a terminal to each wire end, plug a blade of the fuse into a terminal, the other blade into the other terminal, and you have a fused wire. Easy & quick. If you don’t have a shrouded receptacle, you can use a bare receptacle and apply heat-shrink tubing to it. The only parts of a blade fuse that conduct electricity are the blades,and these would be entirely shrouded by the insulated receptacle, so no additional insulation would be necessary. The innards of the fuse are visible through its plastic casing.
      I’ve been using fuse assemblies like this for years in my trucks to add fused circuits for radios, no trouble at all with them. I do wrap such fuse assemblies in electrical tape to keep water & dirt out of them, and to prevent corrosion from humidity.

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My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net

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