How-To: Build A Reciprocal Roof

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How-To:  Build A Reciprocal Roof

Brian Liloia documented his build of this unusual round roof in 2008, while living in Missouri. This type of self-supporting structure, in which each beam bears the weight of another, and has its weight born by yet another, and all arranged such the load is thus distributed ’round in a continuous cycle, is called a reciprocal frame. It requires at least three members, and you can build a simple working model with matchsticks. [via No Tech Magazine]

12 thoughts on “How-To: Build A Reciprocal Roof

  1. Joel Finkle says:

    Am I the only one who is disturbed by the thought of my roof being built from matchsticks?
    “Dude, that’s so totally not up to code.”

  2. Anonymous says:

    Cleveland roofers like me would never get the inspectors approval for something this cool! For some reason, it kind of reminds me of a yurt or tipi style roof.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Cleveland roofers like me would never get the inspectors approval for something this cool! For some reason, it kind of reminds me of a yurt or tipi style roof.

  4. Anonymous says:

    I wonder
    if what it will look when this kind of roof will finished. It is quite
    difficult to work it. However, I admire it because it so creative and unique.
     

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  5. Anonymous says:

     

    I can say that it was great design roof but I’m just
    thinking if it’s tough too, I like roof with unique designs and can be use for
    commercial purposes. Some people already have it, I was planning to establish
    it next month I’m hoping that I can do it.
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  6. Galliena Gornet says:

    Oh, this model can perfectly fit houses on the seashores! I can imagine resorts restaurants or rest houses using that kind of roof. They can either cover it with colored plastic or huge leaves for a more gorgeous effect!

    Galliena Gornet

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I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I am a long-time contributor to MAKE magazine and makezine.com. My work has also appeared in ReadyMade, c't – Magazin für Computertechnik, and The Wall Street Journal.

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