Maker Faire First Day Favorites

Maker Faire Bay Area opened Saturday with an excited rush of the gates. Here are some of the favorite things I saw from the robotic orchestra to Christian Ristow’s metal face and the lock picking workshop organized by Christina Pei. There’s a solar oven popping popcorn and a village made from masking tape with a colorful backdrop of coat hangers. It was an amazing day.

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6 thoughts on “Maker Faire First Day Favorites

  1. The amount of creativity and engineering shown here is tremendous. Maker Faire is contributing to a new economy and giving kids an exposure they can get nowhere else. At times I felt like I was at a special futuristic party in the year 2050. Got to get one of those Maker Bot Replicators. . .

  2. Want a REAL challenge.
    Take groups and hit the Town areas..
    Checkout the local hardware companies and Advert for them.
    Show off all your creations. Show them it can be done in their area.

    IF you can, gather a few artists in that area.

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DALE DOUGHERTY is the leading advocate of the Maker Movement. He founded Make: Magazine 2005, which first used the term “makers” to describe people who enjoyed “hands-on” work and play. He started Maker Faire in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006, and this event has spread to nearly 200 locations in 40 countries, with over 1.5M attendees annually. He is President of Make:Community, which produces Make: and Maker Faire.

In 2011 Dougherty was honored at the White House as a “Champion of Change” through an initiative that honors Americans who are “doing extraordinary things in their communities to out-innovate, out-educate and out-build the rest of the world.” At the 2014 White House Maker Faire he was introduced by President Obama as an American innovator making significant contributions to the fields of education and business. He believes that the Maker Movement has the potential to transform the educational experience of students and introduce them to the practice of innovation through play and tinkering.

Dougherty is the author of “Free to Make: How the Maker Movement Is Changing our Jobs, Schools and Minds” with Adriane Conrad. He is co-author of "Maker City: A Practical Guide for Reinventing American Cities" with Peter Hirshberg and Marcia Kadanoff.

View more articles by Dale Dougherty