Inspired by a video game, I wanted a stuffed animal of a certain character. I discovered it wasn’t difficult to turn 3D models into viable sewing patterns. Here’s my process.

I started with this awesome 3D model of Baby Roshan. It is made up of approximately three things.


The first is a set of 3D points, to define its shape.

The second is a set of 2D points (called UVs), to define how textures are applied to it.


The third is the texture itself.


I wanted to print the texture as a custom print fabric, so my final stuffed animal will have the same colorations as the 3D model, the texture, in its original state, can’t be sewn together. The two chief problems. The first problem was that the seams of the UV (which maps the texture onto the 3D model) are awkward for sewing. They can’t join together to recover the original 3D shape. The second problem was that the UVs seams aren’t of the same length. For example, since UVs map the 2D to 3D, the two 2D edges that map to the same 3D edge may not be of the same length.

The solution was to create a new set of UVs mapped to the same original model.
These UVs cut up the model into viable pattern pieces.



I now need a new texture that reflect the new UV mapping.

So having two sets of UVs that map to the same 3D model, transformation matrices can be calculated to transform the old texture into a new texture. Using scripts that I wrote, I transformed every face, and assembled the result. Here’s one of several pieces.


This new texture I printed into fabric and sewed together to create the stuffed animal.



This same process can be applied to other 3D models for things such as clothing design and car seat covering.

I hope this inspired you.

Come see my talk at the World Maker Faire in NYC, 4:30pm–5pm Saturday, at Maker Square.



This post was originally published on the Caret Dash Caret.