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At first glance, this contraption could definitely pass as a scientific apparatus and, in a way, it is because coffee geeks take their caffeinated beverages very seriously. Instructables Designer Jonathan Odom proves that he is no exception with this cold brew coffee maker build he pieced together using 3D printed fittings, laboratory glassware, and maple dowels.

As Odom cites in his Instructable, there are innumerable methods for making cold brew ice coffee. From slow to crash cooling, from traditional to experimental, if it’s a way to steep coffee grounds in water, you can bet that someone somewhere has attempted it. Odom’s build is a really elegant solution for those who are more patient coffee brewers. He describes the resulting joe as “incredibly smooth, nutty, floral coffee without the acidic bite.” Sign me up!

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Odom designed his build using Fusion 360. He originally planned to hang his brewer from the wall, but instead opted to go with a three-footed stand. He printed a couple versions of his design before coming to a satisfactory result. He notes that between Fusion 360 and the Dremel Idea Builder, printing was a generally straightforward process. He then sandblasted the parts for a smooth matte finish.

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After 3D printing, he created a siphon for the upper flask in order to allow for proper drainage and then fitted all the parts together. Once assembled, you simply load up the funnel with coffee grounds, fill the upper flask with ice, and let’er drip. Odom reports that 500ml of ice water took about 4 hours to brew. “It’s mesmerizing and kind of relaxing watching it drip,” he says. Like a delicious, caffeinated hourglass.

In retrospect, Odom notes that he would opt for a bigger filter funnel to allow for more clearance, and also bigger flasks in case he wants to brew a larger batch. Still, the contraption is pretty impressive as it stands now!

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