Hello Makers, In the month of September we had 43 newly certified open-source pieces of hardware. Today we will take a look into them!

First we have “Ajolote” badges from Electronic Cats. This was created especially to teach anyone to solder their first electronic card; It is a very basic soldering kit and suitable for all ages.

This “Ajolote” kit has two coloured LEDs with different light patterns! The switch allows you to turn the device on or off and it also contains a battery holder. Once the badge kit is soldered and the battery inserted, the badge LED will blink and change colour for approximately 24 hours.

Electronic Cats certified other hardware too, including CatWANShield , it is a long-range transceiver with LoRa shield technology for the Arduino and based on the mic and RFM95 open source libraries,

The catWAN_Relay is a LoRa device which works in the 915 Mhz band and has a 3 relay outputs and 3 Opto-isolated inputs. It can be powered from 12v to 24v with a on/off jumper, so it can connect CNC or a PLC as well to a LoRaWAN network.

Catsat zero kit has everything you need to build a “peak-satellite”, better known as a “can” satellite or CanSat. The CaTSat Zero has a series of modules integrated by flight computer, sensors and communications.

Electronic Cats also certified a Feather format based LoRa with a RAK4260 core device called BastWAN. It supports both Arduino and CircuitPython.

Electronic Cats Croquette ATECC608, based on an ATECC608 is the latest crypto-auth chip from Microchip. It uses I2C to send/receive commands. Once you ‘lock’ the chip with your details, you can use it for ECDH and AES-128 encrypt/decrypt/signing. There’s also hardware support for random number generation, and SHA-256/HMAC hash functions to greatly speed up a slower micro’s cryptography commands.

Electronic Cats also has another badge named Badge Sam Sweet Dreams that will teach us how to solder your first SMD surface solder component, electronic board.

Ever think about a device that allows you to store all of your credit cards and magstripes in one device? Here it is!

The MagSpoof is a device that can spoof/emulate any magnetic stripe or credit card. It can work “wirelessly”, even on standard magstripe/credit card readers, by generating a strong electromagnetic field that emulates a traditional magnetic stripe card.

You can read more details at MagSpoof – credit card/magstripe spoofer

Last month we saw that Great Scott Gadgets HackRF one certified, and this month they certified the YARD Stick One. It is a sub-1 GHz wireless test tool controlled by our computer.

YARD Stick One (Yet Another Radio Dongle) can transmit or receive digital wireless signals at frequencies below 1 GHz from Great Scott Gadgets. It uses the same radio circuit as the popular IM-Me. YARD Stick One features half-duplex transmit and receive in ASK, OOK, GFSK, 2-FSK, 4-FSK, MSK modulations with data rates up to 500 kbps.

GreatScott Gadgets also certified there Ubertooth One, it’s an open source 2.4 GHz wireless development platform suitable for Bluetooth experimentation, It can be used as BLE (Bluetooth Smart) sniffer and can sniff some data from Basic Rate (BR) Bluetooth Classic connections.

Next, we have a huge list of Adafruit industries this month certified hardware,

There are a total of 19 boards certified by Adafruit Industries in September:

First is the MPM3610 Breakout. It’s a little buck converter based on the MPM3610. It takes up to 21V input and provides a 3.3V output with up to 1.2A current. It’s great for supplying power to popular 3.3V voltage circuits from a range of battery or power options. They also have an AP3429A Breakout. It’s based on AP3429A taking up to 5.5V input and providing a 3.3V output with up to 1.2A current. It’s great for supplying power to popular 3.3V voltage circuits from a range of battery or power options.

The TMP235 – Plug-and-Play STEMMA Analog Temperature Sensor – TMP235 is an analogue temperature sensor with a 3-pin JST connector. Unlike many of Adafruit’s temperature sensors, this one is analogue output, not I2C, so it’s best used by a microcontroller with analogue input, as most microcontrollers do.

These sensors are very simple to use, no libraries or complex configurations required. Plug this board into any of our 3-pin JST PH cables Red goes to 3V to 5V DC power, black wire connects to ground, and white wire connects to an analogue input. The voltage out is 0V at -50°C and 1.75V at 125°C.

Next, we have open hardware from Pi Supply. They certified their Traffic PHat, RTK.GPIO Home, and RTK Motor Controller .

The Traffic PHat has 3 on-board LEDs (Red, Yellow, Green) It’s a simple board that easily shows the status of all the things!.

The RTK Raspberry Pi Motor Controller Board is a simple to use & budget-friendly motor controller board for the Raspberry Pi which allows you to easily control 2 motors in both directions with some simple coding!

And the RTK GPIO board allows you to connect the world of physical computing to your desktop PC or laptop. The RTK GPIO board emulates the original Raspberry Pi 40-pin GPIO header allowing you to program for the Raspberry Pi on your computer. The board is fully compatible with Windows, Mac OS and Linux and is designed to work with python.

 

 

In this month we also have the first certified hardware from Costa Rica: the Arduino-compatible Simple relay module. We also received the first certification from Guatemala: a device designed in commemoration of the celebration of 10 years of the FIT event called Smart Badge.

You can find information about certifying your own open source hardware for free at the OSHWA Application page. See you next month.