Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

 41308199 Masai203 Computers donated from the developed world are both fuelling and feeding an appetite for computers in Africa where a new machine could cost more than a year’s wages. “The students are very happy and even the community comes to witness. It’s a big achievement for a school, and if it’s a school in one area you might find a migration of students from other schools without computers. Link.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


Related

Comments

  1. jim.christian@gmail.com says:

    Having taken a trip to Tanzania earlier this year to work with children at a street centre, I can tell you firsthand that this is an event of such huge importance, it is staggering. One of the local charities in Mkombozi teaches the children how to build the computer from parts themselves, thus furthering their knowledge of the system and building on their English language skills. As one of the kids said in the BBC article, having English as a language means in many cases that they can go to work in areas where poverty is not so prevalent. Truly great stuff.