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Curious how to solder those tiny parts on to PCBs? (Printed circuit boards) Here’s a 6 page tutorial that covers the basics as well as hot-air rework… Nathan writes – “More and more ICs come in surface mount packages only these days. And I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard someone say ‘Well I can’t solder that because it’s SMD’. They’re wrong! You can solder anything. That’s right, anything from your own dorm-cell-room. That’s 0.5mm from pin to pin! 50 pin connector for the GM862. You too can solder this! This tutorial will show you just how to solder crazy things like this connector, leadless ICs, etc. “Link.

Related:

  • Using SMT components in your electronics projects – Link.
  • Solder surface mount parts with a toaster oven… – Link.
  • More SMD soldering – Link.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


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Comments

  1. japroach says:

    Nice article, has more info than most of the SMD soldering tutorials that get posted quite often.

    btw I want one of those hot air stations badly :)

  2. MrSpock says:

    This is a waste of time. I can do the same chip in less than 5 minutes using a flat blade soldering iron tip and liberal amounts of liquid solder flux. I learned this tecnique from a Sony training video. The solder flux acts as a barrier to any potential solder bridges allowing you to literally solder several pins at once.

  3. Ken says:

    You used way to much solder. Less is better for reliability. Also to the previous comment solder flux is not a barrier to bridges. Solder flux only helps cleaning and wetting. You stop bridges with a good clean board and parts. Also don’t wipe your iron before returning to the holder. This will make your tips last for years.

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