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The latest Gadget Freak from Design News show you how to build a quarter-sized temperature recorder -

NASA engineer Bob Wilson devised a technological solution for a bureaucratic problem: convince building maintenance that his office was frigid in the morning. By the time anyone responded to a call, the heat was on. So he programmed a TI MSP430-F2013 microcontroller to record the temperature continuously over several days. The size of a quarter and powered by a 3V lithium cell, it records converted, filtered, RL-encoded data from its built-in temperature transducer into Flash memory, to be read back later via a USB interface. The maintenance department was convinced.

Case #99: Bob Had a Problem with the Thermal Management – 3/19/2007 – Design News – Link.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


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Comments

  1. Shadyman says:

    Ha! Now THAT’s problem solving!

  2. ericcherry says:

    Alright Bob! I know Bob as a customer at the Apple Reseller I work at. Not just a customer, but also the smartest customer (in my opinion anyways… which is always fact :-) ).

    His LED hack for a broken backlight on a laptop is over-the-top, and the mods to his Prius are that much more so. Really interesting guy, hopefully more will be heard from him.

  3. RussNelson says:

    Yeah, TI sells the USB emulator and a target board for $20, and extra target boards at 3 for $10. It’s a sweet little piece of hardware. http://www.ti.com/designmsp430

  4. Mr_Stabby says:

    The same thing could also be done using an ibutton from maxim, They do free samples, just not as much fun as building it yourself.

  5. zmoney86 says:

    Haha, this reminds me of when I was in high school. The room’s thermostat was completely unresponsive and the room would be too cold in the winter and too hot in the summer. He used to put a damp rag on it to trick it into thinking the room was too cold and run the heater. I built him a little device using components from an old power supply that mounted to the thermostat allowed him to either run a fan over it or run current through a resistor to trick it into thinking the room is too cold or hot respectively.