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Here is a fuel cell for RC cars, $1,500! That thing is faaaaast!

The H-cell is a unique integration “upgrade” kit for electric hobby R/C cars, designed as a drop in unit that can fit inside widely available Tamiya TT-01 type chassis. The H-cell system designed by Horizon Fuel Cell Technologies includes a 30W air-cooled, air-breathing and self-humidified PEM fuel cell stack with integrated bright blue light-emitting fans and a sleek aluminium casing. The integration kit also includes electronic controls, a miniature pressure regulator and three 10L metal hydride canisters in a hydrogen storage “rack”. At maximum power output and with a single charge, the H-cell can run the car at 35 km/h for over 1 hour, as opposed to just 15 minutes with the conventional Nimh battery.

HORIZONFUELCELL – [via] Link.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


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Comments

  1. superdude4agze says:

    Most electric RC cars are that fast. But I wouldn’t mind a fuel cell powered one.

  2. wiredmilk says:

    I think it’s awsome… but at $1500USD it’s out of range for most R/C car enthusiasts. This is MAKE…. anyone post a link or reference to any work on a DIY version? I love the idea.. but as with most new cool shiny blue things… it’s out of the question for my workin’ man’s wallet.

  3. philliptorrone says:

    @wiredmilk – yes this is MAKE, but that doesn’t mean we won’t cover new developments in technology and inspire cheaper/better solutions.

    have a diy version? send us the link.

  4. dansdata says:

    Note that the “conventional NiMH battery” will be a 7.2V one with about a 3.3Ah capacity. If you drain that in 15 minutes, you’re drawing an average of 95 watts, more than three times the maximum output of the fuel cell.

    (15 minutes to flat is pretty normal for these cars, out of the box. FOUR minute races are still common in the modified motor classes; a well-dialed-in car doesn’t have enough power left over for a victory lap.)

    This isn’t to say that this thing isn’t a neat technical achievement when compared with the little balsa wood fuel cell demo cars that’ve been available up ’til now. But it doesn’t actually allow the car to carry around much more energy than it could with a $30 battery, and the battery car will outperform it.

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